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      Assessment patient satisfaction towards emergency medical care and its determinants at Ayder comprehensive specialized hospital, Mekelle, Northern Ethiopia

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          Abstract

          Background

          As the healthcare industry shifts toward patient-centered models, providers will need to fully understand patient satisfaction and how they affect their practices. This study aimed to assess patient satisfaction towards the emergency medical care and factors associated with at Ayder specialized comprehensive hospital, Emergency room, Mekelle, Ethiopia.

          Methods

          An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March 1–30, 2019. A systematic random sampling method was used to enroll 299 study participants. Data were collected using a standard Brief Emergency Department Patient Satisfaction Scale questionnaire by trained data collectors. Data was entered into EpiData 3.1 then exported and analyzed by SPSS version 22. Binary and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the factors associated with patient satisfaction. Where the p-value of <0.05 was considered significant.

          Results

          A total of 299 participants were enrolled in the study with a response rate of 99.3%. On overall patient satisfaction score majority (81.9%) of them were satisfied with the emergency medical care provided. The satisfaction rate towards emergency staff courtesy, emergency room environment, physician care satisfaction, general patient satisfaction, and patient family satisfaction was 80.3%, 37.5%, 75.9%, 70.9%, and 49.8% respectively. Those who arrived during the morning time of the day tend to be satisfied more with the emergency services (AOR = 4.8, 95% CI: 2.08, 11.4), while having low educational status (able to read and write) (AOR = 0.12, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.50) and waiting time till seen by a doctor (AOR = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.003, 1.4) was found to affect patient satisfaction negatively.

          Conclusions

          The total patient satisfaction score towards emergency medical care was found to be good. The hospital management and emergency room staff should act on the identified factors especially on minimizing the patients waiting time to improve the quality of care in the emergency department.

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          Most cited references 18

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          Emergency medical care in developing countries: is it worthwhile?

          Prevention is a core value of any health system. Nonetheless, many health problems will continue to occur despite preventive services. A significant burden of diseases in developing countries is caused by time-sensitive illnesses and injuries, such as severe infections, hypoxia caused by respiratory infections, dehydration caused by diarrhoea, intentional and unintentional injuries, postpartum bleeding, and acute myocardial infarction. The provision of timely treatment during life-threatening emergencies is not a priority for many health systems in developing countries. This paper reviews evidence indicating the need to develop and/or strengthen emergency medical care systems in these countries. An argument is made for the role of emergency medical care in improving the health of populations and meeting expectations for access to emergency care. We consider emergency medical care in the community, during transportation, and at first-contact and regional referral facilities. Obstacles to developing effective emergency medical care include a lack of structural models, inappropriate training foci, concerns about cost, and sustainability in the face of a high demand for services. A basic but effective level of emergency medical care responds to perceived and actual community needs and improves the health of populations.
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            Patient satisfaction survey as a tool towards quality improvement.

            Over the past 20 years, patient satisfaction surveys have gained increasing attention as meaningful and essential sources of information for identifying gaps and developing an effective action plan for quality improvement in healthcare organizations. However, there are very few published studies reporting of the improvements resulting from feedback information of patient satisfaction surveys, and in most cases, these studies are contradictory in their findings. This article investigates in-depth a number of research studies that critically discuss the relationship of dependent and independent influential attributes towards overall patient satisfaction in addition to its impact on the quality improvement process of healthcare organizations.
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              Emergency department patient satisfaction survey in Imam Reza Hospital, Tabriz, Iran

              Introduction Patient satisfaction is an important indicator of the quality of care and service delivery in the emergency department (ED). The objective of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction with the Emergency Department of Imam Reza Hospital in Tabriz, Iran. Methods This study was carried out for 1 week during all shifts. Trained researchers used the standard Press Ganey questionnaire. Patients were asked to complete the questionnaire prior to discharge. The study questionnaire included 30 questions based on a Likert scale. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used throughout data analysis in a number of ways using SPSS version 13. Results Five hundred patients who attended our ED were included in this study. The highest satisfaction rates were observed in the terms of physicians' communication with patients (82.5%), security guards' courtesy (78.3%) and nurses' communication with patients (78%). The average waiting time for the first visit to a physician was 24 min 15 s. The overall satisfaction rate was dependent on the mean waiting time. The mean waiting time for a low rate of satisfaction was 47 min 11 s with a confidence interval of (19.31, 74.51), and for very good level of satisfaction it was 14 min 57 s with a (10.58, 18.57) confidence interval. Approximately 63% of the patients rated their general satisfaction with the emergency setting as good or very good. On the whole, the patient satisfaction rate at the lowest level was 7.7 with a confidence interval of (5.1, 10.4), and at the low level it was 5.8% with a confidence interval of (3.7, 7.9). The rate of satisfaction for the mediocre level was 23.3 with a confidence interval of (19.1, 27.5); for the high level of satisfaction it was 28.3 with a confidence interval of (22.9, 32.8), and for the very high level of satisfaction, this rate was 32.9% with a confidence interval of (28.4, 37.4). Conclusion The study findings indicated the need for evidence-based interventions in emergency care services in areas such as medical care, nursing care, courtesy of staff, physical comfort and waiting time. Efforts should focus on shortening waiting intervals and improving patients' perceptions about waiting in the ED, and also improving the overall cleanliness of the emergency room.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Formal analysisRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: Software
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: InvestigationRole: Methodology
                Role: Formal analysisRole: Writing – original draft
                Role: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: Writing – original draft
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curation
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS One
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                7 January 2021
                2021
                : 16
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Emergency and Critical Care Nursing, School of Nursing, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia
                [2 ] Ayder Comprehensive Specialized Hospital, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia
                Cheng-Hsin General Hospital, TAIWAN
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                Article
                PONE-D-20-06847
                10.1371/journal.pone.0243764
                7790252
                33411806
                © 2021 Molalign Takele et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 0, Tables: 4, Pages: 10
                Product
                Funding
                The author(s) received no specific funding for this work.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Critical Care and Emergency Medicine
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Health Care
                Patients
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Health Care
                Health Care Providers
                Physicians
                People and Places
                Population Groupings
                Professions
                Medical Personnel
                Physicians
                People and Places
                Population Groupings
                Educational Status
                People and Places
                Geographical Locations
                Africa
                Ethiopia
                Social Sciences
                Sociology
                Education
                Schools
                Research and Analysis Methods
                Mathematical and Statistical Techniques
                Statistical Methods
                Regression Analysis
                Physical Sciences
                Mathematics
                Statistics
                Statistical Methods
                Regression Analysis
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Health Care
                Quality of Care
                Custom metadata
                All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting information.

                Uncategorized

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