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      The relationship between life stressors and drug and sexual behaviors among a population-based sample of young Black men who have sex with men in Chicago

      research-article
      , PhD 1 , , PhD, MPH 2 , , MD, MPH 2 , 3 , The UConnect study team.
      AIDS care

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          Abstract

          Younger Black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) have the highest rates of HIV incidence in the U.S. and are also exposed to high life stressors (e.g., unemployment, incarceration, and exposure to communality). This study assessed whether life stressors were related to drug use and sexual risk behaviors among a representative sample of YBMSM. The South Side of Chicago and selected adjacent suburbs represents the most populous contiguous Black community in the United States. Over 10% of the estimated YBMSM population in this geographic region were sampled. Major findings indicated that higher life stress was significantly associated with greater odds of transactional sex (aOR=2.19; 95% CI 1.09–4.39), substance use with sex with male and transgender partners (aOR=1.62; 95% CI 1.09–2.39) marijuana (aOR= 2.65; 95% CI 1.43–4.90), crack/cocaine (aOR= 3.21; 95% CI 1.16–8.88) and prescription opioid use (aOR=3.12; 95% CI 1.37–7.13). HIV approaches which focus on environmental stressors and employ a stress and coping framework may support the reduction of drug and sexual risk behaviors among YBMSM. Cognitive and social support approaches might be especially useful in this regard.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          8915313
          1056
          AIDS Care
          AIDS Care
          AIDS care
          0954-0121
          1360-0451
          7 July 2017
          02 September 2016
          May 2017
          01 May 2018
          : 29
          : 5
          : 545-551
          Affiliations
          [1 ]School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago
          [2 ]School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago; University of Chicago
          [3 ]Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Chicago
          Author notes

          UConnect Study Team: Stuart Michaels, Ishida Robinson, Eve Zurawski, Billy Davis, Kenneth Mayer, Ron Stall, Sam Friedman, Steve Muth, Michelle Taylor, Iman Little

          Article
          PMC5577924 PMC5577924 5577924 nihpa887681
          10.1080/09540121.2016.1224303
          5577924
          27590043
          78fbfed3-9b85-4d07-b03f-72e632ee1351
          Categories
          Article

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