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      Vessel formation. De novo formation of a distinct coronary vascular population in neonatal heart.

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          Abstract

          The postnatal coronary vessels have been viewed as developing through expansion of vessels formed during the fetal period. Using genetic lineage tracing, we found that a substantial portion of postnatal coronary vessels arise de novo in the neonatal mouse heart, rather than expanding from preexisting embryonic vasculature. Our data show that lineage conversion of neonatal endocardial cells during trabecular compaction generates a distinct compartment of the coronary circulation located within the inner half of the ventricular wall. This lineage conversion occurs within a brief period after birth and provides an efficient means of rapidly augmenting the coronary vasculature. This mechanism of postnatal coronary vascular growth provides avenues for understanding and stimulating cardiovascular regeneration following injury and disease.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Science
          Science (New York, N.Y.)
          American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
          1095-9203
          0036-8075
          Jul 04 2014
          : 345
          : 6192
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200031, China.
          [2 ] Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China.
          [3 ] State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, Institute of Biotechnology, Beijing 100071, China.
          [4 ] State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China.
          [5 ] Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Department of Cardiology, Children's Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
          [6 ] Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200031, China. zhoubin@sibs.ac.cn.
          Article
          345/6192/90 NIHMS649746
          10.1126/science.1251487
          4275002
          24994653

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