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      Incidence of Infectious Morbidity and Mortality in Dialysis Patients

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          Abstract

          Infections remain among the major causes of disease, hospitalization and death in uremic patients, especially in those treated by dialysis. Several pathophysiologic factors enhance this infectious risk: (1) breakdown of protective barriers; (2) affinity of bacteria for foreign materials; (3) bioincompatibility; (4) uremic toxin retention; (5) deficiency and resistance to vitamin D; (6) carriership of germs, and (7) malnutrition. Twenty to 30% of dialysis patients develop infection, and 20–30% of these die from their infection. Sepsis is significantly more frequent, and mortality secondary to sepsis is 50 times higher than in the normal population. Bacteremia (prevalence 1 episode/100 patient-months) is mainly caused by Gram-positive species, especially in vascular access-related infection and infection of unknown origin. Among these Gram-positive germs, staphylococci play a predominant role. The most frequent and most morbid viral infections are associated with hepatitis. Whereas the incidence of hepatitis B decreases, hepatitis C has become the major variant. The incidence of tuberculosis has increased up to 15 times, and in the Western world it mainly affects patients who immigrated from endemic areas. Fungal infections are also frequent, especially in the setting of peritoneal dialysis. In conclusion, infections remain a frequent and morbid problem in dialysis patients. Preventive measures should be applied more vigorously.

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          Bloodstream infections with vancomycin-resistant enterococci

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            Author and article information

            Journal
            BPU
            Blood Purif
            10.1159/issn.0253-5068
            Blood Purification
            S. Karger AG
            978-3-8055-7480-8
            978-3-318-00898-2
            0253-5068
            1421-9735
            2002
            2002
            30 August 2002
            : 20
            : 5
            : 477-480
            Affiliations
            Nephrology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital, Gent, Belgium
            Article
            63556 Blood Purif 2002;20:477–480
            10.1159/000063556
            12207097
            © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

            Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

            Page count
            References: 42, Pages: 4
            Product
            Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/63556
            Categories
            Proceedings

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