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      Indigenous Philosophies and the "Psychedelic Renaissance"

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          Abstract

          The Western world is experiencing a resurgence of interest in the therapeutic potential of psychedelics, most of which are derived from plants or fungi with a history of Indigenous ceremonial use. Recent research has revealed that psychedelic compounds have the potential to address treatment‐resistant depression and anxiety, as well as post‐traumatic stress disorder and addictions. These findings have contributed to the decriminalization of psychedelics in some jurisdictions and their legalization in others. Despite psychedelics’ opaque legal status, numerous companies and individuals are profiting from speculative investments with few, if any, benefits accruing to Indigenous Peoples. In this paper, we suggest that the aptly named “psychedelic renaissance,” like the European Renaissance, is made possible by colonial extractivism. We further suggest that Indigenous philosophical traditions offer alternative approaches to reorient the “psychedelic renaissance” towards a more equitable future for Indigenous Peoples, psychedelic medicines, and all our relations.

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          Most cited references94

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          Vibrant Matter

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            Suspending Damage: A Letter to Communities

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              How Forests Think

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
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                Journal
                Anthropology of Consciousness
                Anthropol of Consciousness
                Wiley
                1053-4202
                1556-3537
                September 2022
                July 30 2022
                September 2022
                : 33
                : 2
                : 506-527
                Affiliations
                [1 ] First Nations Technical Institute Director of Research and Social Innovation
                [2 ] Department of History University of Saskatchewan
                [3 ] Queensland University of Technology University of Technology Sydney and Southern Cross University ‐ Sessional Academic
                [4 ] First Nations Technical Institute President
                Article
                10.1111/anoc.12161
                7957763d-f174-485c-95fa-30a8c9e13571
                © 2022

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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