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      Domestic Space and Memory: Remembering Deirdre Madden’s One by One in the Darkness and the Belfast Agreement

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          Abstract

          This article posits the home as a key site in the Northern Irish conflict and examines the possibilities opened up by the home in Deirdre Madden’s 1996 novel One by One in the Darkness for dealing with the past, developing subjectivity and building solidarity, resilience and resistance. In dealing with these themes, this article will examine how Madden’s text, set in the run-up to the first IRA ceasefire in 1994 and published in 1996 at the tail-end of the conflict, anticipates some of the rhetoric of the Belfast Agreement and the discourse around it, but also how it fills in some of the gaps left by the Agreement and even challenges aspects of it. In thinking about Madden’s intense focus on the home, I draw on the work of Adam Hanna, Daniel Miller, Sara McDowell and Catherine Switzer and Rhona Richman-Kenneally. Madden’s novel is explicitly concerned with memory and representation and I will examine these preoccupations with reference to the theories of memory-studies theorists Guy Beiner, Graham Dawson and Rebecca Graff-McRae. In my final section I will make use of theories of memory, narrative, power and agency put forward by various social and discursive psychologists, drawing particularly on the work of Cristian Tileagă, to examine how the characters use their past experiences to deal with a situation of political and personal turmoil. I argue that Madden offers us a different, more radical and dynamic form of remembering than more conventional, static forms of remembrance in Northern Ireland and suggests the spaces on which we should be turning our attention.

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          Most cited references 6

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          Group identification and historical memory.

          Differences in ingroup identification can influence the accessibility of historical memories. In Study 1, the authors examined individual differences in identity; in Study 2 they experimentally manipulated identity. In Study 1, high identifiers recalled fewer incidents of ingroup violence and hatred than did low identifiers. High and low identifiers did not differ in their recall of ingroup suffering. In Study 2, participants in the high-identity condition recalled fewer incidents of violence and hatred by members of their group than did those in the low-identity condition but a similar number of good deeds. Control participants recalled more positive than negative group actions; this bias was exaggerated in the high-identity condition and eliminated in the low-identity condition. The authors interpret the results as indicating the effects of social identity on individual-level memory processes, especially schema-consistent recall. They evaluate other explanations of the bias, including collective censorship of negative histories.
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            Commemorating dead ‘men’: gendering the past and present in post-conflict Northern Ireland

             Sara McDowell (2008)
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              Creating counterspaces: identity and the home in Ireland and Northern Ireland in Environment and Planning

               B Reid,  Bryonie Reid,  B. REID (2007)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                2056-6700
                Open Library of Humanities
                Open Library of Humanities
                2056-6700
                06 November 2018
                2018
                : 4
                : 2
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Ulster University, IE
                Article
                10.16995/olh.359
                Copyright: © 2018 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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                Self URI (journal-page): https://olh.openlibhums.org/
                Categories
                #Agreement20

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