Blog
About

8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      An 8.5 m long ammonite drag mark from the Upper Jurassic Solnhofen Lithographic Limestones, Germany

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Trackways and tracemakers preserved together in the fossil record are rare. However, the co-occurrence of a drag mark, together with the dead animal that produced it, is exceptional. Here, we describe an 8.5 m long ammonite drag mark complete with the preserved ammonite shell ( Subplanites rueppellianus) at its end. Previously recorded examples preserve ammonites with drag marks of < 1 m. The specimen was recovered from a quarry near Solnhofen, southern Germany. The drag mark consists of continuous parallel ridges and furrows produced by the ribs of the ammonite shell as it drifted just above the sediment surface, and does not reflect behaviour of the living animal.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 35

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          First trace and body fossil evidence of a burrowing, denning dinosaur.

          A fossil discovery in the mid-Cretaceous Blackleaf Formation of southwest Montana, USA, has yielded the first trace and body fossil evidence of burrowing behaviour in a dinosaur. Skeletal remains of an adult and two juveniles of Oryctodromeus cubicularis gen. et sp. nov. a new species of hypsilophodont-grade dinosaur, were found in the expanded distal chamber of a sediment-filled burrow. Correspondence between burrow and adult dimensions supports Oryctodromeus as the burrow maker. Additionally, Oryctodromeus exhibits features of the snout, shoulder girdle and pelvis consistent with digging habits while retaining cursorial hindlimb proportions. Association of adult and young within a terminal chamber provides definitive evidence of extensive parental care in the Dinosauria. As with modern vertebrate cursors that dig, burrowing in Oryctodromeus may have been an important adaptation for the rearing of young. Burrowing also represents a mechanism by which small dinosaurs may have exploited the extreme environments of polar latitudes, deserts and high mountain areas. The ability among dinosaurs to find or make shelter may contradict some scenarios of the Cretaceous-Paleogene impact event. Burrowing habits expand the known range of nonavian dinosaur behaviours and suggest that the cursorial ancestry of dinosaurs did not fully preclude the evolution of different functional regimes, such as fossoriality.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Ammonite biostratigraphy as a tool for dating Upper Jurassic lithographic limestones from South Germany – first results and open questions

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Synchrotron Reveals Early Triassic Odd Couple: Injured Amphibian and Aestivating Therapsid Share Burrow

              Fossorialism is a beneficial adaptation for brooding, predator avoidance and protection from extreme climate. The abundance of fossilised burrow casts from the Early Triassic of southern Africa is viewed as a behavioural response by many tetrapods to the harsh conditions following the Permo-Triassic mass-extinction event. However, scarcity of vertebrate remains associated with these burrows leaves many ecological questions unanswered. Synchrotron scanning of a lithified burrow cast from the Early Triassic of the Karoo unveiled a unique mixed-species association: an injured temnospondyl amphibian (Broomistega) that sheltered in a burrow occupied by an aestivating therapsid (Thrinaxodon). The discovery of this rare rhinesuchid represents the first occurrence in the fossil record of a temnospondyl in a burrow. The amphibian skeleton shows signs of a crushing trauma with partially healed fractures on several consecutive ribs. The presence of a relatively large intruder in what is interpreted to be a Thrinaxodon burrow implies that the therapsid tolerated the amphibian’s presence. Among possible explanations for such unlikely cohabitation, Thrinaxodon aestivation is most plausible, an interpretation supported by the numerous Thrinaxodon specimens fossilised in curled-up postures. Recent advances in synchrotron imaging have enabled visualization of the contents of burrow casts, thus providing a novel tool to elucidate not only anatomy but also ecology and biology of ancient tetrapods.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                10 May 2017
                2017
                : 12
                : 5
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
                [2 ]Liverpool John Moores University, School of Natural Sciences and Psychology, Liverpool, United Kingdom
                [3 ]Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde, Stuttgart, Germany
                [4 ]CosmoCaixa Museum, Barcelona, Spain
                Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, SWEDEN
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                • Conceptualization: DRL.

                • Data curation: DRL PLF.

                • Formal analysis: DRL PLF.

                • Funding acquisition: DRL.

                • Investigation: DRL.

                • Methodology: DRL PLF.

                • Project administration: DRL.

                • Software: PLF.

                • Supervision: DRL APJ.

                • Validation: DRL PLF GS APJ.

                • Visualization: DRL PLF GS APJ.

                • Writing – original draft: DRL.

                • Writing – review & editing: DRL PLF GS APJ.

                Article
                PONE-D-16-50789
                10.1371/journal.pone.0175426
                5425149
                28489915
                © 2017 Lomax et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 3, Tables: 1, Pages: 9
                Product
                Funding
                The authors received no funding for this work.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Paleontology
                Biostratigraphy
                Index Fossils
                Ammonites
                Earth Sciences
                Paleontology
                Biostratigraphy
                Index Fossils
                Ammonites
                Earth Sciences
                Geology
                Stratigraphy
                Biostratigraphy
                Index Fossils
                Ammonites
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Paleontology
                Fossils
                Index Fossils
                Ammonites
                Earth Sciences
                Paleontology
                Fossils
                Index Fossils
                Ammonites
                Physical Sciences
                Physics
                Classical Mechanics
                Continuum Mechanics
                Fluid Mechanics
                Fluid Dynamics
                Drag
                Earth Sciences
                Mineralogy
                Minerals
                Limestone
                Earth Sciences
                Geology
                Geologic Time
                Mesozoic Era
                Jurassic Period
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Paleontology
                Fossils
                Trace Fossils
                Earth Sciences
                Paleontology
                Fossils
                Trace Fossils
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Paleontology
                Paleobiology
                Ichnology
                Trace Fossils
                Earth Sciences
                Paleontology
                Paleobiology
                Ichnology
                Trace Fossils
                Earth Sciences
                Geology
                Petrology
                Sediment
                Earth Sciences
                Geology
                Sedimentary Geology
                Sediment
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Paleontology
                Fossils
                Earth Sciences
                Paleontology
                Fossils
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Paleontology
                Paleobiology
                Paleozoology
                Earth Sciences
                Paleontology
                Paleobiology
                Paleozoology
                Custom metadata
                3D model generated via photogrammetry, including source photos taken by DRL and APJ. Model consists of 5,000,000 faces, downsampled from an original model of 20,206,944 faces. Texture resolution is 8000x8000. Available from: https://doi.org/10.6084/M9.figshare.4479734. Digital model of the complete drag mark, generated using photogrammetry of 645 photographs, showing close-up of the drag mark and the producer. Available from: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.4502807.

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article