56
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      DNA methylation: roles in mammalian development

      ,
      Nature Reviews Genetics
      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          DNA methylation is among the best studied epigenetic modifications and is essential to mammalian development. Although the methylation status of most CpG dinucleotides in the genome is stably propagated through mitosis, improvements to methods for measuring methylation have identified numerous regions in which it is dynamically regulated. In this Review, we discuss key concepts in the function of DNA methylation in mammals, stemming from more than two decades of research, including many recent studies that have elucidated when and where DNA methylation has a regulatory role in the genome. We include insights from early development, embryonic stem cells and adult lineages, particularly haematopoiesis, to highlight the general features of this modification as it participates in both global and localized epigenetic regulation.

          Related collections

          Most cited references141

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Principles and challenges of genomewide DNA methylation analysis.

          Methylation of cytosine bases in DNA provides a layer of epigenetic control in many eukaryotes that has important implications for normal biology and disease. Therefore, profiling DNA methylation across the genome is vital to understanding the influence of epigenetics. There has been a revolution in DNA methylation analysis technology over the past decade: analyses that previously were restricted to specific loci can now be performed on a genome-scale and entire methylomes can be characterized at single-base-pair resolution. However, there is such a diversity of DNA methylation profiling techniques that it can be challenging to select one. This Review discusses the different approaches and their relative merits and introduces considerations for data analysis.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            DNMT3L connects unmethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 to de novo methylation of DNA.

            Mammals use DNA methylation for the heritable silencing of retrotransposons and imprinted genes and for the inactivation of the X chromosome in females. The establishment of patterns of DNA methylation during gametogenesis depends in part on DNMT3L, an enzymatically inactive regulatory factor that is related in sequence to the DNA methyltransferases DNMT3A and DNMT3B. The main proteins that interact in vivo with the product of an epitope-tagged allele of the endogenous Dnmt3L gene were identified by mass spectrometry as DNMT3A2, DNMT3B and the four core histones. Peptide interaction assays showed that DNMT3L specifically interacts with the extreme amino terminus of histone H3; this interaction was strongly inhibited by methylation at lysine 4 of histone H3 but was insensitive to modifications at other positions. Crystallographic studies of human DNMT3L showed that the protein has a carboxy-terminal methyltransferase-like domain and an N-terminal cysteine-rich domain. Cocrystallization of DNMT3L with the tail of histone H3 revealed that the tail bound to the cysteine-rich domain of DNMT3L, and substitution of key residues in the binding site eliminated the H3 tail-DNMT3L interaction. These data indicate that DNMT3L recognizes histone H3 tails that are unmethylated at lysine 4 and induces de novo DNA methylation by recruitment or activation of DNMT3A2.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              A critical role for Dnmt1 and DNA methylation in T cell development, function, and survival.

              The role of DNA methylation and of the maintenance DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1 in the epigenetic regulation of developmental stage- and cell lineage-specific gene expression in vivo is uncertain. This is addressed here through the generation of mice in which Dnmt1 was inactivated by Cre/loxP-mediated deletion at sequential stages of T cell development. Deletion of Dnmt1 in early double-negative thymocytes led to impaired survival of TCRalphabeta(+) cells and the generation of atypical CD8(+)TCRgammadelta(+) cells. Deletion of Dnmt1 in double-positive thymocytes impaired activation-induced proliferation but differentially enhanced cytokine mRNA expression by naive peripheral T cells. We conclude that Dnmt1 and DNA methylation are required for the proper expression of certain genes that define fate and determine function in T cells.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Reviews Genetics
                Nat Rev Genet
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1471-0056
                1471-0064
                March 2013
                February 12 2013
                March 2013
                : 14
                : 3
                : 204-220
                Article
                10.1038/nrg3354
                23400093
                799b7ebd-17f8-41fb-9c97-3ec4f607f710
                © 2013

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article