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      Inflammation and tumor progression: signaling pathways and targeted intervention

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          Abstract

          Cancer development and its response to therapy are regulated by inflammation, which either promotes or suppresses tumor progression, potentially displaying opposing effects on therapeutic outcomes. Chronic inflammation facilitates tumor progression and treatment resistance, whereas induction of acute inflammatory reactions often stimulates the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) and antigen presentation, leading to anti-tumor immune responses. In addition, multiple signaling pathways, such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB), Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT), toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways, cGAS/STING, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); inflammatory factors, including cytokines (e.g., interleukin (IL), interferon (IFN), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α), chemokines (e.g., C-C motif chemokine ligands (CCLs) and C-X-C motif chemokine ligands (CXCLs)), growth factors (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β), and inflammasome; as well as inflammatory metabolites including prostaglandins, leukotrienes, thromboxane, and specialized proresolving mediators (SPM), have been identified as pivotal regulators of the initiation and resolution of inflammation. Nowadays, local irradiation, recombinant cytokines, neutralizing antibodies, small-molecule inhibitors, DC vaccines, oncolytic viruses, TLR agonists, and SPM have been developed to specifically modulate inflammation in cancer therapy, with some of these factors already undergoing clinical trials. Herein, we discuss the initiation and resolution of inflammation, the crosstalk between tumor development and inflammatory processes. We also highlight potential targets for harnessing inflammation in the treatment of cancer.

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          Most cited references921

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          Global Cancer Statistics 2018: GLOBOCAN Estimates of Incidence and Mortality Worldwide for 36 Cancers in 185 Countries

          This article provides a status report on the global burden of cancer worldwide using the GLOBOCAN 2018 estimates of cancer incidence and mortality produced by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, with a focus on geographic variability across 20 world regions. There will be an estimated 18.1 million new cancer cases (17.0 million excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer) and 9.6 million cancer deaths (9.5 million excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer) in 2018. In both sexes combined, lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer (11.6% of the total cases) and the leading cause of cancer death (18.4% of the total cancer deaths), closely followed by female breast cancer (11.6%), prostate cancer (7.1%), and colorectal cancer (6.1%) for incidence and colorectal cancer (9.2%), stomach cancer (8.2%), and liver cancer (8.2%) for mortality. Lung cancer is the most frequent cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among males, followed by prostate and colorectal cancer (for incidence) and liver and stomach cancer (for mortality). Among females, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer death, followed by colorectal and lung cancer (for incidence), and vice versa (for mortality); cervical cancer ranks fourth for both incidence and mortality. The most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer death, however, substantially vary across countries and within each country depending on the degree of economic development and associated social and life style factors. It is noteworthy that high-quality cancer registry data, the basis for planning and implementing evidence-based cancer control programs, are not available in most low- and middle-income countries. The Global Initiative for Cancer Registry Development is an international partnership that supports better estimation, as well as the collection and use of local data, to prioritize and evaluate national cancer control efforts. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 2018;0:1-31. © 2018 American Cancer Society.
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            Hallmarks of Cancer: The Next Generation

            The hallmarks of cancer comprise six biological capabilities acquired during the multistep development of human tumors. The hallmarks constitute an organizing principle for rationalizing the complexities of neoplastic disease. They include sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, and activating invasion and metastasis. Underlying these hallmarks are genome instability, which generates the genetic diversity that expedites their acquisition, and inflammation, which fosters multiple hallmark functions. Conceptual progress in the last decade has added two emerging hallmarks of potential generality to this list-reprogramming of energy metabolism and evading immune destruction. In addition to cancer cells, tumors exhibit another dimension of complexity: they contain a repertoire of recruited, ostensibly normal cells that contribute to the acquisition of hallmark traits by creating the "tumor microenvironment." Recognition of the widespread applicability of these concepts will increasingly affect the development of new means to treat human cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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              COVID-19: consider cytokine storm syndromes and immunosuppression

              As of March 12, 2020, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been confirmed in 125 048 people worldwide, carrying a mortality of approximately 3·7%, 1 compared with a mortality rate of less than 1% from influenza. There is an urgent need for effective treatment. Current focus has been on the development of novel therapeutics, including antivirals and vaccines. Accumulating evidence suggests that a subgroup of patients with severe COVID-19 might have a cytokine storm syndrome. We recommend identification and treatment of hyperinflammation using existing, approved therapies with proven safety profiles to address the immediate need to reduce the rising mortality. Current management of COVID-19 is supportive, and respiratory failure from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the leading cause of mortality. 2 Secondary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (sHLH) is an under-recognised, hyperinflammatory syndrome characterised by a fulminant and fatal hypercytokinaemia with multiorgan failure. In adults, sHLH is most commonly triggered by viral infections 3 and occurs in 3·7–4·3% of sepsis cases. 4 Cardinal features of sHLH include unremitting fever, cytopenias, and hyperferritinaemia; pulmonary involvement (including ARDS) occurs in approximately 50% of patients. 5 A cytokine profile resembling sHLH is associated with COVID-19 disease severity, characterised by increased interleukin (IL)-2, IL-7, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, interferon-γ inducible protein 10, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1-α, and tumour necrosis factor-α. 6 Predictors of fatality from a recent retrospective, multicentre study of 150 confirmed COVID-19 cases in Wuhan, China, included elevated ferritin (mean 1297·6 ng/ml in non-survivors vs 614·0 ng/ml in survivors; p 39·4°C 49 Organomegaly None 0 Hepatomegaly or splenomegaly 23 Hepatomegaly and splenomegaly 38 Number of cytopenias * One lineage 0 Two lineages 24 Three lineages 34 Triglycerides (mmol/L) 4·0 mmol/L 64 Fibrinogen (g/L) >2·5 g/L 0 ≤2·5 g/L 30 Ferritin ng/ml 6000 ng/ml 50 Serum aspartate aminotransferase <30 IU/L 0 ≥30 IU/L 19 Haemophagocytosis on bone marrow aspirate No 0 Yes 35 Known immunosuppression † No 0 Yes 18 The Hscore 11 generates a probability for the presence of secondary HLH. HScores greater than 169 are 93% sensitive and 86% specific for HLH. Note that bone marrow haemophagocytosis is not mandatory for a diagnosis of HLH. HScores can be calculated using an online HScore calculator. 11 HLH=haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. * Defined as either haemoglobin concentration of 9·2 g/dL or less (≤5·71 mmol/L), a white blood cell count of 5000 white blood cells per mm3 or less, or platelet count of 110 000 platelets per mm3 or less, or all of these criteria combined. † HIV positive or receiving longterm immunosuppressive therapy (ie, glucocorticoids, cyclosporine, azathioprine).
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                cqmdwyz@163.com
                lys@cqu.edu.cn
                Journal
                Signal Transduct Target Ther
                Signal Transduct Target Ther
                Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2095-9907
                2059-3635
                12 July 2021
                12 July 2021
                2021
                : 6
                : 263
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.190737.b, ISNI 0000 0001 0154 0904, Department of Medical Oncology, , Chongqing University Cancer Hospital, ; Chongqing, China
                [2 ]GRID grid.190737.b, ISNI 0000 0001 0154 0904, Department of Radiotherapy, , Chongqing University Cancer Hospital, ; Chongqing, China
                Article
                658
                10.1038/s41392-021-00658-5
                8273155
                34248142
                79d07f79-d492-4d58-ba15-ef03e0c90e29
                © The Author(s) 2021

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                History
                : 3 January 2021
                : 11 May 2021
                : 23 May 2021
                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100010904, National Science Foundation of China | Major International Joint Research Programme;
                Award ID: 81920108027
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
                Review Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2021

                tumour immunology
                tumour immunology

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