0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Potential Value of CML-Hb in Predicting the Progression of Bone Cysts in Dialysis-Related Amyloidosis

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background/Aim: Carboxymethyllysine is one of the common advanced glycation end products in vivo. In a previous report, we were the first to describe the increase of circulating carboxymethyllysine-hemoglobin (CML-Hb) levels in hemodialysis patients, particularly in patients with dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA). The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of CML-Hb in the progression of DRA using computed tomography images of 2-year or 3-year follow-up periods of patients with amyloid bone cysts at the hip joint. Methods: Circulating CML-Hb levels were measured as previously reported, and computed tomography scanning was conducted from 1996 to 1998 or 1999 in 57 hemodialysis patients whose original renal disease had been confirmed to be nondiabetic. Patients who showed a new growth of cysts or a growth rate of 30% or more were classified as progressive cases, while the other patients were classified as nonprogressive cases. Results: (1) The circulating CML-Hb levels showed a strong correlation with the DRA score by multiple regression analysis, and (2) patients with progression of amyloid cysts showed a significantly higher circulating CML-Hb level than patients without progression. Conclusion: Based upon these results, we conclude that measurement of circulating CML-Hb levels has a potential value in both judgment of the clinical state and prediction of progression of DRA in hemodialysis patients.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 4

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Nε-(Carboxymethyl)Lysine Adducts of Proteins Are Ligands for Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products That Activate Cell Signaling Pathways and Modulate Gene Expression

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Molecular identity and cellular distribution of advanced glycation endproduct receptors: relationship of p60 to OST-48 and p90 to 80K-H membrane proteins.

            Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are derivatives of nonenzymatic reactions between sugars and protein or lipids, and together with AGE-specific receptors are involved in numerous pathogenic processes associated with aging and hyperglycemia. Two of the known AGE-binding proteins isolated from rat liver membranes, p60 and p90, have been partially sequenced. We now report that the N-terminal sequence of p60 exhibits 95% identity to OST-48, a 48-kDa member of the oligosaccharyltransferase complex found in microsomal membranes, while sequence analysis of p90 revealed 73% and 85% identity to the N-terminal and internal sequences, respectively, of human 80K-H, a 80- to 87-kDa protein substrate for protein kinase C. AGE-ligand and Western analyses of purified oligosaccharyltransferase complex, enriched rough endoplasmic reticulum, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and plasma membranes from rat liver or RAW 264.7 macrophages yielded a single protein of approximately 50 kDa recognized by both anti-p60 and anti-OST-48 antibodies, and also exhibited AGE-specific binding. Immunoprecipitated OST-48 from rat rough endoplasmic reticulum fractions exhibited both AGE binding and immunoreactivity to an anti-p60 antibody. Immune IgG raised to recombinant OST-48 and 80K-H inhibited binding of AGE-bovine serum albumin to cell membranes in a dose-dependent manner. Immunostaining and flow cytometry demonstrated the surface expression of OST-48 and 80K-H on numerous cell types and tissues, including mononuclear, endothelial, renal, and brain neuronal and glial cells. We conclude that the AGE receptor components p60 and p90 are identical to OST-48, and 80K-H, respectively, and that they together contribute to the processing of AGEs from extra- and intracellular compartments and in the cellular responses associated with these pathogenic substances.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Immunohistochemical localization of different epitopes of advanced glycation end products in human atherosclerotic lesions.

              To better understand the role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in atherogenesis, we developed specific antibodies against different immunological epitopes of AGE structures, including Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine-protein adduct (CML) and a structure(s) other than CML (nonCML), and demonstrated the immunohistochemical localization of CML- and nonCML-epitopes in atherosclerotic lesions of human aorta, which were obtained at autopsy from 20 nondiabetic patients (12 males and eight females; mean age, 60.8+/-16.7 years). Monoclonal anti-CML antibody (6D12) recognized not only AGE-modified proteins, but also CML-modified proteins. On the other hand, polyclonal anti-nonCML antibody reacted to AGE-modified proteins, but not to CML-modified proteins. Both antibodies were unreactive to the early-stage products of glycation, including fructose-modified butyloxycarbonyl-lysine and fructose-epsilon-aminocaproic acid. Atherosclerotic lesions included diffuse intimal thickening (DIT), fatty streaks (FS), atherosclerotic plaques (AP) and complicated lesions. An immunohistochemical analysis showed both CML- and nonCML-epitopes to be found along the collagen fibers in DIT in subjects more than 40 years old, but not in subjects less than 40 years old. CML-epitopes accumulated mainly in the cytoplasm of macrophage/foam cells, while nonCML-epitopes accumulated exclusively in the extracellular spaces in FS. APs showed the CML-epitope stored macrophage/foam cells, and the accumulation of both CML- and nonCML-epitopes in the lipid-rich fibrous area. An immunohistochemical analysis with a monoclonal antibody against oxidized low density lipoprotein (FOH1a/DLH3) showed the presence of this antigen within the cytoplasm of the macrophage/foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions, which were also positive for the CML-epitopes. These findings thus suggest that the heterogeneous localization of AGEs in atherosclerotic lesions depends on their different epitopes, and that a close link, therefore, exists between the peroxidation of LDL and the formation of AGEs in atherosclerotic lesions.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                NEF
                Nephron
                10.1159/issn.1660-8151
                Nephron
                S. Karger AG
                1660-8151
                2235-3186
                2001
                2001
                10 October 2001
                : 89
                : 3
                : 286-290
                Affiliations
                aSuiyukai Clinic, Kashihara, bA & T Corporation, Kashima-gun, cDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Kumamoto, and dDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, Kagoshima University School of Medicine, Kagoshima, Japan
                Article
                46087 Nephron 2001;89:286–290
                10.1159/000046087
                11598391
                © 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 2, Tables: 2, References: 20, Pages: 5
                Product
                Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/46087
                Categories
                Original Paper

                Comments

                Comment on this article