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      Developmental social neuroscience: An introduction

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      Social Neuroscience

      Informa UK Limited

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          Most cited references 6

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          Cyberball: a program for use in research on interpersonal ostracism and acceptance.

          Since the mid-1990s, research on interpersonal acceptance and exclusion has proliferated, and several paradigms have evolved that vary in their efficiency, context specificity, and strength. This article describes one such paradigm, Cyberball, which is an ostensibly online ball-tossing game that participants believe they are playing with two or three others. In fact, the "others" are controlled by the programmer. The course and speed of the game, the frequency of inclusion, player information, and iconic representation are all options the researcher can regulate. The game was designed to manipulate independent variables (e.g., ostracism) but can also be used as a dependent measure of prejudice and discrimination. The game works on both PC and Macintosh (OS X) platforms and is freely available.
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            At the Intersection of Emotion and Cognition. Aging and the Positivity Effect

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              A new look at infant pointing.

              The current article proposes a new theory of infant pointing involving multiple layers of intentionality and shared intentionality. In the context of this theory, evidence is presented for a rich interpretation of prelinguistic communication, that is, one that posits that when 12-month-old infants point for an adult they are in some sense trying to influence her mental states. Moreover, evidence is also presented for a deeply social view in which infant pointing is best understood--on many levels and in many ways--as depending on uniquely human skills and motivations for cooperation and shared intentionality (e.g., joint intentions and attention with others). Children's early linguistic skills are built on this already existing platform of prelinguistic communication.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Social Neuroscience
                Social Neuroscience
                Informa UK Limited
                1747-0919
                1747-0927
                October 14 2010
                October 14 2010
                : 5
                : 5-6
                : 417-421
                Article
                10.1080/17470919.2010.510002
                © 2010

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