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      Acoustic emission characterization of sliding wear under condition of direct and inverse transformations in low- temperature degradation aged Y-TZP and Y-TZP-Al 2O 3

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          Abstract

          In this research, results of the investigation of the sliding friction and wear of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) and Y-TZP-Al 2O 3 samples preliminarily subjected to low-temperature degradation are reported. The investigation was carried out using a pin-on-disk tribometer with simultaneous recording of acoustic emission (AE) and vibration acceleration. The sliding wear process was found to be determined by dynamic direct and inverse Y-TZP transformations detected by monoclinic and tetragonal X-ray diffraction peak ratios. The AE signals generated under direct and inverse transformations can be used to characterize wear and friction mechanisms as well as direct and inversed sliding-induced phase transformations. The AE signal energy grows with the friction coefficient and the inverse transformation degree. Reduction of the AE signal energy indicates establishing the mild wear stage caused by effective stress-induced direct martensitic transformation. The AE signal median frequency increases in the case of lower friction. Numerical studies of wear subsurface fracture under conditions of stress-induced martensitic transformation were used to elucidate the role played by the phase transformation in Y-TZP and Y-TZP-Al 2O 3. Martensitic transformation in Y-TZP was described with use of the non-associated dilatant plasticity model. Simulation results particularly show that increase in the value of dilatancy coefficient from 0 to 0.2 is accompanied by 25%−30% reduce in characteristic length and penetration depth of sliding-induced subsurface cracks. As shown the AE may be an effective tool for in-situ monitoring the subsurface wear of materials experiencing both direct and inverse transformations.

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          Most cited references 36

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Tsinghua Science and Technology
                Friction
                Tsinghua University Press (Xueyuan Building, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China )
                2223-7690
                05 September 2018
                : 06
                : 03
                : 323-340 (pp. )
                Affiliations
                [ 1 ] Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk 634055, Russian Federation
                [ 2 ] National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk 634050, Russian Federation
                [ 3 ] National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050, Russian Federation
                Author notes
                * Corresponding author: Nikolai L SAVCHENKO, E-mail: savnick@ 123456ispms.ru

                Nikolai L SAVCHENKO. He received his MS degree in metallurgical engineer at the Tomsk Polytechnic Institute (USSR) in 1987, PhD degree in physics in 1995 and Dr Sci degree in materials in 2015 at the Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS in Tomsk (Russia). His current position is the leading researcher of Laboratory for Quality Control in Materials and Structures in the Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS. His research focuses on CMC and MMC tribology, interfacial phenomena, surface characterization, etc.

                Andrey V FILIPPOV. He received his PhD degree at the Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS in 2015. He joined the Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU), Department of at Materials Machining Technologies in 2011. His current positions are a researcher at the Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Laboratory of Surface Hardening Physics, and an associate professor at Tomsk Polytechnic University. His research areas cover structural evolution of fine- and ultrafine-grained materials under severe subsurface deformation by friction and cutting with detailed analysis of vibration and acoustic emission phenomena.

                Sergei Yu TARASOV. He received his PhD and Dr. Sci. degrees at the Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS in 1994 and 2009, respectively. His current position is a leading researcher at the Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS. He joined the Tomsk Polytechnic University in 2013 as a professor. His research areas cover all aspects of material structural evolution materials under severe subsurface deformation by friction with special attention given to friction stir processing of iron- and aluminum–base materials.

                Andrey I DMITRIEV. He received his PhD and Dr. Sci. degrees in condensed mater physics at the Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science (ISPMS) SB RAS in 1997 and 2006, respectively . He joined the Tomsk State University (TSU), Department of Metal Physics in 2005. His current positions are a principal researcher at ISPMS SB RAS, Laboratory of Computer-Aided Design of Materials, and a professor at Tomsk State University. His research areas cover computer modeling in tribology and nanotribology using numerical methods of various scales on the basis of discrete approach.

                Evgeny V SHILKO. He received his MS degree in solid state physics in 1995 from Tomsk State University, Russia. After that he obtained his PhD and Dr Sci degrees in deformable solid mechanics at the Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS (ISPMS SB RAS), Tomsk, Russia, in 1998 and 2007, respectively. He joined the Laboratory of Computer-Aided Design of Materials at ISPMS SB RAS from 1998. His current positions are a principal researcher of the laboratory and a professor at the Physical Faculty at Tomsk State University. His research areas cover computer modeling of fracture at different scales, mechanics of fluid-saturated solids and contact mechanics.

                Aleksandr S GRIGORIEV. He received his MS degree in applied mechanics in 2012 from Tomsk State University, Russia. He joined the Laboratory of Computer-Aided Design of Materials at the Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS (ISPMS SB RAS), Tomsk, Russia, from 2012. His current position is a junior researcher of the laboratory. His research interests include computer modeling in the fields of dynamic mechanical behavior of solids, rock mechanics and contact interaction of solids.

                Article
                2223-7690-06-03-323
                10.1007/s40544-018-0226-6

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Page count
                Figures: 16, Tables: 2, References: 40, Pages: 18
                Categories
                Research Article

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