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SILVA: a comprehensive online resource for quality checked and aligned ribosomal RNA sequence data compatible with ARB

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      Abstract

      Sequencing ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes is currently the method of choice for phylogenetic reconstruction, nucleic acid based detection and quantification of microbial diversity. The ARB software suite with its corresponding rRNA datasets has been accepted by researchers worldwide as a standard tool for large scale rRNA analysis. However, the rapid increase of publicly available rRNA sequence data has recently hampered the maintenance of comprehensive and curated rRNA knowledge databases. A new system, SILVA (from Latin silva, forest), was implemented to provide a central comprehensive web resource for up to date, quality controlled databases of aligned rRNA sequences from the Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya domains. All sequences are checked for anomalies, carry a rich set of sequence associated contextual information, have multiple taxonomic classifications, and the latest validly described nomenclature. Furthermore, two precompiled sequence datasets compatible with ARB are offered for download on the SILVA website: (i) the reference (Ref) datasets, comprising only high quality, nearly full length sequences suitable for in-depth phylogenetic analysis and probe design and (ii) the comprehensive Parc datasets with all publicly available rRNA sequences longer than 300 nucleotides suitable for biodiversity analyses. The latest publicly available database release 91 (August 2007) hosts 547 521 sequences split into 461 823 small subunit and 85 689 large subunit rRNAs.

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      Most cited references 37

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      Greengenes, a chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbench compatible with ARB.

      A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was found that there is incongruent taxonomic nomenclature among curators even at the phylum level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and in 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages in the Archaea and Bacteria.
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        ARB: a software environment for sequence data.

        The ARB (from Latin arbor, tree) project was initiated almost 10 years ago. The ARB program package comprises a variety of directly interacting software tools for sequence database maintenance and analysis which are controlled by a common graphical user interface. Although it was initially designed for ribosomal RNA data, it can be used for any nucleic and amino acid sequence data as well. A central database contains processed (aligned) primary structure data. Any additional descriptive data can be stored in database fields assigned to the individual sequences or linked via local or worldwide networks. A phylogenetic tree visualized in the main window can be used for data access and visualization. The package comprises additional tools for data import and export, sequence alignment, primary and secondary structure editing, profile and filter calculation, phylogenetic analyses, specific hybridization probe design and evaluation and other components for data analysis. Currently, the package is used by numerous working groups worldwide.
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          Microbial diversity in the deep sea and the underexplored "rare biosphere".

          The evolution of marine microbes over billions of years predicts that the composition of microbial communities should be much greater than the published estimates of a few thousand distinct kinds of microbes per liter of seawater. By adopting a massively parallel tag sequencing strategy, we show that bacterial communities of deep water masses of the North Atlantic and diffuse flow hydrothermal vents are one to two orders of magnitude more complex than previously reported for any microbial environment. A relatively small number of different populations dominate all samples, but thousands of low-abundance populations account for most of the observed phylogenetic diversity. This "rare biosphere" is very ancient and may represent a nearly inexhaustible source of genomic innovation. Members of the rare biosphere are highly divergent from each other and, at different times in earth's history, may have had a profound impact on shaping planetary processes.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            1Microbial Genomics Group, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, 2University Bremen, Center for Computing Technologies, D-28359, 3Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH, D-28759, 4Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, D-28359 Bremen, 5Department for Microbiology, Technical University Munich, D-85354 Freising and 6Ribocon GmbH, D-28359 Bremen
            Author notes
            *To whom correspondence should be addressed. +49 421 2028970+49 421 2028580 fog@ 123456mpi-bremen.de

            The authors wish it to be known that, in their opinion, the first two authors should be regarded as joint First Authors.

            Journal
            Nucleic Acids Res
            Nucleic Acids Res
            nar
            nar
            Nucleic Acids Research
            Oxford University Press
            0305-1048
            1362-4962
            December 2007
            18 October 2007
            18 October 2007
            : 35
            : 21
            : 7188-7196
            17947321
            2175337
            10.1093/nar/gkm864
            © 2007 The Author(s)

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

            Categories
            Computational Biology

            Genetics

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