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      Clinical Benefit and Approach of Ultrafiltration in Acute Heart Failure

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          Abstract

          Because of the increasing incidence of acute heart failure admissions to critical care units, nephrologists have been asked to become more involved in the management of these patients. Renal dysfunction is a major element in impeding clinical recovery. In acute heart failure, renal function is often abnormal. The judicious application of ultrafiltration techniques may represent an efficacious adjunct to present conventional practice. In patients with refractory congestive heart failure, the ability to provide continuous, daily, large volume removal not only improves volume status but also the clinical symptoms of the decompensated patient. A thorough literature review supports the premise that starting hemofiltration is an appropriate alternative for difficult and unstable cardiac patients. An optimal strategy utilizing continuous renal replacement therapy can dramatically improve the patient’s clinical condition, mitigate the neurohumoral stimulation, increase urinary output and promote absorption of excessive extravascular fluid.

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          Most cited references 3

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          Intensive Care Unit Management of the Critically Ill Patient with Fluid Overload after Open Heart Surgery

          Fluid overload is common before, during and after cardiac surgery. The fluid associated with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and cardioplegia is a particularly important source of such fluid overload. In addition, renal dysfunction, which is common in these patients, participates in the pathogenesis of a positive sodium and water balance. Such fluid overload is physiologically undesirable and participates in the pathogenesis of several clinically important complications. Fluid overload can be partly prevented with the use of diuretics. However, in many patients, diuretics do not achieve sufficient sodium and water diuresis. In these patients, the application of hemofiltration (HF) during CPB and also immediately after CPB is an effective and safe approach to the maintenance of fluid homeostasis. If acute renal failure occurs, early intervention with HF may even improve survival.
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            Use of Calcium Antagonists in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease and Systemic Hypertension

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              • Abstract: not found
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              Isolated ultrafiltration in the treatment of fluid overload in cardiogenic shock

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                CRD
                Cardiology
                10.1159/issn.0008-6312
                Cardiology
                S. Karger AG
                978-3-8055-7380-1
                978-3-318-00820-3
                0008-6312
                1421-9751
                2001
                2001
                18 January 2002
                : 96
                : 3-4
                : 144-154
                Affiliations
                Division of Nephrology, University of California, San Diego, Calif., USA
                Article
                47398 Cardiology 2001;96:144–154
                10.1159/000047398
                11805381
                © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Tables: 6, References: 53, Pages: 11
                Categories
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