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Assessing the feasibility of interrupting the transmission of soil-transmitted helminths through mass drug administration: The DeWorm3 cluster randomized trial protocol

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      Abstract

      Current control strategies for soil-transmitted helminths (STH) emphasize morbidity control through mass drug administration (MDA) targeting preschool- and school-age children, women of childbearing age and adults in certain high-risk occupations such as agricultural laborers or miners. This strategy is effective at reducing morbidity in those treated but, without massive economic development, it is unlikely it will interrupt transmission. MDA will therefore need to continue indefinitely to maintain benefit. Mathematical models suggest that transmission interruption may be achievable through MDA alone, provided that all age groups are targeted with high coverage. The DeWorm3 Project will test the feasibility of interrupting STH transmission using biannual MDA targeting all age groups. Study sites (population ≥80,000) have been identified in Benin, Malawi and India. Each site will be divided into 40 clusters, to be randomized 1:1 to three years of twice-annual community-wide MDA or standard-of-care MDA, typically annual school-based deworming. Community-wide MDA will be delivered door-to-door, while standard-of-care MDA will be delivered according to national guidelines. The primary outcome is transmission interruption of the STH species present at each site, defined as weighted cluster-level prevalence ≤2% by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), 24 months after the final round of MDA. Secondary outcomes include the endline prevalence of STH, overall and by species, and the endline prevalence of STH among children under five as an indicator of incident infections. Secondary analyses will identify cluster-level factors associated with transmission interruption. Prevalence will be assessed using qPCR of stool samples collected from a random sample of cluster residents at baseline, six months after the final round of MDA and 24 months post-MDA. A smaller number of individuals in each cluster will be followed with annual sampling to monitor trends in prevalence and reinfection throughout the trial.

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      ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03014167

      Author summary

      Soil-transmitted helminths (STH) affect 1.45 billion people worldwide, and high intensity infections are associated with anemia, undernutrition and impaired cognition, particularly among children. Mathematical models suggest it may be possible to interrupt the transmission of STH in a community by expanding mass drug administration (MDA) from targeted high-risk groups (primarily school-aged children and women of child-bearing age) to all community members with high coverage. The DeWorm3 Project will test the feasibility of this approach to interrupting the transmission of STH using a series of cluster randomized trials in Benin, India and Malawi. Each study area (population ≥80,000) will be divided into 40 clusters and randomized to community-wide or standard-of-care targeted MDA for three years. Two years following the final round of MDA, prevalence of STH will be compared between arms and transmission interruption assessed in each cluster. The DeWorm3 trials will provide stakeholders with information regarding the potential to switch from STH control to a more ambitious and sustainable strategy.

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      Most cited references 23

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      Global numbers of infection and disease burden of soil transmitted helminth infections in 2010

      Background Quantifying the burden of parasitic diseases in relation to other diseases and injuries requires reliable estimates of prevalence for each disease and an analytic framework within which to estimate attributable morbidity and mortality. Here we use data included in the Global Atlas of Helminth Infection to derive new global estimates of numbers infected with intestinal nematodes (soil-transmitted helminths, STH: Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and the hookworms) and use disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) to estimate disease burden. Methods Prevalence data for 6,091 locations in 118 countries were sourced and used to estimate age-stratified mean prevalence for sub-national administrative units via a combination of model-based geostatistics (for sub-Saharan Africa) and empirical approaches (for all other regions). Geographical variation in infection prevalence within these units was approximated using modelled logit-normal distributions, and numbers of individuals with infection intensities above given thresholds estimated for each species using negative binomial distributions and age-specific worm/egg burden thresholds. Finally, age-stratified prevalence estimates for each level of infection intensity were incorporated into the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 analytic framework to estimate the global burden of morbidity and mortality associated with each STH infection. Results Globally, an estimated 438.9 million people (95% Credible Interval (CI), 406.3 - 480.2 million) were infected with hookworm in 2010, 819.0 million (95% CI, 771.7 – 891.6 million) with A. lumbricoides and 464.6 million (95% CI, 429.6 – 508.0 million) with T. trichiura. Of the 4.98 million years lived with disability (YLDs) attributable to STH, 65% were attributable to hookworm, 22% to A. lumbricoides and the remaining 13% to T. trichiura. The vast majority of STH infections (67%) and YLDs (68%) occurred in Asia. When considering YLDs relative to total populations at risk however, the burden distribution varied more considerably within major global regions than between them. Conclusion Improvements in the cartography of helminth infection, combined with mathematical modelling approaches, have resulted in the most comprehensive contemporary estimates for the public health burden of STH. These numbers form an important benchmark upon which to evaluate future scale-up of major control efforts.
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        Prevention and control of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis.

          (2001)
        This report contains the recommendations of a WHO Expert Committee convened to consider the prevention and control of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminth infections. Although these infections remain major public health concerns in many parts of the world, particularly in the poorest developing countries, cost-effective solutions are both available and deliverable. The report reviews the burden of disease, its impact on both health and development, the substantial benefits of treatment, and the safety, efficacy and ease of administration of available anthelminthic drugs. Similarities in the population at risk and in the tools required to combat the problems have prompted moves towards a combined approach to the control of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis. Such an approach relies largely on epidemiological surveillance, health education, improvements in hygiene and sanitation, and--above all--regular treatment of high-risk groups, particularly school-age children. The report focuses on how these various elements can be achieved, emphasizing the potential of the school system for drug delivery and health education and the opportunities for integration of control activities with existing health programmes. It also stresses that the cost of recommended anthelminthic drugs has now fallen to a level at which it should no longer deter Member States from making treatment widely available in endemic areas. The recommendations of the Expert Committee provide clear and strategic guidance on the implementation of control measures and on ensuring their sustainability.
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          Soil-Transmitted Helminth Reinfection after Drug Treatment: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

          Introduction Infections with soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) affect more than 1 billion people, particularly the rural poor of the developing world [1], [2]. The four most common STHs are the roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides), the whipworm (Trichuris trichiura), and two hookworm species (Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus) [2]. The greatest number of STH infections occur in Central and South America, People's Republic of China (P.R. China), Southeast Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa [2], [3]. Warm climates and adequate moisture are essential for the hatching or embryonation of STH eggs in the environment or development of larvae. Important contextual determinants for human infection are poverty, lack of sanitation, and inadequate hygiene (e.g., absence of hand washing with soap after defecation and before eating, and walking barefoot) [4]–[6]. In such social-ecological systems, multiple species STH infections are common [7]. Transmission of STHs occurs via contact with contaminated soil (hookworm) or consumption of egg-contaminated foods (A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura) [4]. An important epidemiological feature is their highly aggregated distribution: the majority of patients harbor low intensity infections, while only few individuals harbor very heavy infections [8]. People infected with STHs may suffer from anemia, growth stunting, diminished physical fitness, and impaired cognitive development [7], representing a persistent drain on social and economic development of low-income countries [9], [10]. The current global strategy to control STH infections is preventive chemotherapy, that is the repeated large-scale administration of anthelmintic drugs to at-risk populations, most importantly school-aged children [11], [12]. A shortcoming of this strategy is failure to prevent reinfection after effective deworming [6], [7], [13], [14]. Hence, identifying factors that determine reinfection risk is crucial to improving the effectiveness of this strategy [15]. To foster the design of more effective integrated control strategies, the objectives of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to assess available evidence on global patterns of STH reinfection after drug treatment, and to identify, through pooled risk estimates, the frequency and leading determinants of STH reinfection. Methods This systematic review was developed in line with the PRISMA guidelines (see Checklist S1) [16]. A protocol was prospectively registered in PROSPERO [17], registration number: CRD42011001678; available from http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.asp?ID=CRD42011001678. Selection Criteria We aimed to include all published studies in English or Chinese in which reinfection with STH was measured, for the period January 1, 1900 to December 31, 2010. Both observational studies and trials were eligible for inclusion. We excluded the following studies: (i) data without rate of infection after preventive chemotherapy; (ii) where time of follow-up was less than 2 months or more than 3 years; (iii) hospital-based or case studies in which the representativeness of the sample for the general population was unknown; and (iv) duplicate publication or extended analysis of previously published studies (see Figure 1 for selection flow of included studies). Additional exclusion criteria were: low adherence (loss rate of subjects at follow-up >30%), low initial prevalence ( 80%) [24], even after exclusion of five studies due to poor quality (three with low adherence rates [32], [36], [39], two with poor CR [13], [28]; for details, see Table S3). Publication and selection bias were not detected visually using funnel plots in eight pooled estimates with the exception of A. lumbricoides at the 3 months posttreatment follow-up time point. Re-Acquired Prevalence of STH at 3 Months Posttreatment For A. lumbricoides, we found a random pooled RR of reinfection, based on five studies, of 0.26 (95% CI: 0.16–0.43) [29], [31], [42]–[44]. The estimates from the individual studies are listed in Figure 2. CRs ranged from 89.7% to 97.7% for three studies [31], [42], [43]. The remaining two studies applied an excluding or retreatment procedure to the uncured [29], [44]. The study carried out by Liu et al. (2006) [44] showed that even after four rounds of treatment with pyrantel pamoate (10 mg/kg per dose given at 3 months interval for a year), the prevalence of A. lumbricoides reached 47% of the original prevalence at 3 months after the final treatment. We also performed a subgroup analysis of school-aged children (6–15 years) after excluding one population-based study [44]. Their pooled RR from four studies was 0.22 (95% CI: 0.13–0.39) [29], [31], [42], [43], slightly less than the value obtained using all age groups. We performed another pooled estimate in view of the detected publication bias caused by one large study (n = 1017) [42]. After excluding this study, the pooled RR changed slightly, rising from 0.26 to 0.29 (95% CI: 0.17–0.51) [29], [31], [43], [44]. 10.1371/journal.pntd.0001621.g002 Figure 2 Forest plot of prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides 3, 6, and 12 months posttreatment. A random relative risk (RR) value of less than 1 indicates a lower infection rate after treatment compared to the initial level. Diamonds represent the pooled estimate across studies. See Table S1 for full references. *The infection rate 3 or 6 months after the last round of treatment was abstracted (Table S3). Due to low CR, only a few studies were included in our evaluation of reinfection with T. trichiura or hookworm at the 3 months posttreatment follow-up. In this review only two studies of T. trichiura and hookworm were included, which is insufficient for pooling [31], [42]. If the threshold of CR was set at 50%, then the resulting RR 3 months after treatment was 0.36 (95% CI: 0.28–0.47) for T. trichiura [31], and 0.30 (95% CI: 0.26–0.34) for hookworm (Table S3) [42]. Re-Acquired Prevalence of STH 6 Months Posttreatment For A. lumbricoides, the random pooled RR derived from nine studies was 0.68 (95% CI: 0.60–0.76) [29], [34], [40]–[44], [46], [47]. Estimates of the individual studies are given in Figure 2. CRs ranged from 92% to 100% in four studies [34], [40], [41], [43], while the remaining five studies applied an excluding or retreatment procedure to the uncured, and hence resulted in a higher CR [29], [42], [44], [46], [47]. We also performed a subgroup analysis of children aged 2–15 years after excluding two population-based studies and obtained a pooled estimate of 0.69 (95% CI: 0.60–0.79) [34], [44]. After three outlier studies were removed [40], [42], [43], the fixed RR was estimated to be 0.71 (95% CI: 0.68–0.75) (I 2 = 0%; χ2 = 3.22, P = 0.67) [29], [34], [41], [44], [46], [47]. For T. trichiura, four studies were included in the pooled estimate, two with moderate CRs (>67%) [34], [47], and two with poor CRs (30–40%), even after two rounds of treatment at 6-month intervals in 1 year (Table S3) [40], [42]. Poor CRs caused two outlier results and a higher pooled estimate without a significant difference from 1 (RR = 0.67; 95% CI: 0.42–1.08) (Figure 3) [34], [40], [42], [47]. When these two outlier studies were excluded [40], [42], the random RR dropped to 0.54 (95% CI: 0.41–0.71) [34], [47]. For hookworm, there were only two studies included with high CR (>90%) [41], [42], and the random RR was 0.55 (95% CI: 0.34–0.87). 10.1371/journal.pntd.0001621.g003 Figure 3 Forest plot of prevalence of Trichuris trichiura or hookworm after treatment. A random relative risk (RR) value of less than 1 indicates a lower infection rate after treatment compared to the initial level. Diamonds represent the pooled estimate across studies. See Table S1 for full references. *The infection rate 6 months after the last round of treatment was abstracted (Table S3). Re-Acquired Prevalence of STH 12 Months Posttreatment Generally, the heterogeneity effect caused by CR, treatment regimen, subpopulation, and variability in study design decreased gradually over the posttreatment follow-up time and became non-significant. STH prevalence tended to regress to the pretreatment level in A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura, and persisted at approximately half the level in the case of hookworm. However, poor adherence in some studies was a major source of heterogeneity, which could introduce an influential outlier. This effect was evaluated for a study in which the adherence rate for A. lumbricoides was relatively high (74%; 724/977), but considerably lower for T. trichiura (56%; 548/977) and hookworm (60%; 588/977) (Table S3) [22]. For A. lumbricoides, eight studies were included, resulting in a random RR of 0.94 (95% CI: 0.88–1.01) (Figure 2 and Table S3) [19], [22], [30], [33], [37], [44], [46], [47]. Removal of two outlier studies [19], [37], resulted in a fixed RR of 0.96 (95% CI: 0.93–0.98) (I 2 = 49%; χ2 = 9.85, P = 0.08). For T. trichiura, there were three studies included with a random RR of 0.82 (95% CI: 0.62–1.07) (Figure 3 and Table S3) [19], [37], [47]. One study was excluded from this pooling due to poor adherence of the T. trichiura cohort (56%; 548/977), of which the individual RR was 0.42 (95% CI: 0.35–0.51) [22]. If combined into the random-effects model, the pooled estimate dropped to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.45–1.05). We ultimately removed this cohort of T. trichiura from the pooled estimate based on our exclusion criteria (Table S3) [22]. For hookworm, there were five studies included with a random RR of 0.57 (95% CI: 0.49–0.67) (Figure 3 and Table S3) [19], [27], [35], [37], [45]. After removing two outlier studies [35], [45], we obtained a fixed RR of 0.57 (95% CI: 0.52–0.62) from three studies (I 2 = 0%; χ2 = 0.32, P = 0.85) [19], [27], [37]. In contrast to A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura, the re-acquired prevalence of hookworm returned to only about half of the initial level. We also removed a cohort of hookworm from the pooled estimate due to poor adherence (Table S3) [22]. Including that study would have resulted in a slightly lower pooled estimate (RR = 0.53; 95% CI: 0.44–0.64). Figure 4 shows the rapidity of re-acquiring soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections at the 3, 6, and 12 months posttreatment follow-up time points. 10.1371/journal.pntd.0001621.g004 Figure 4 Summary of the rapidity of re-acquiring soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections after treatment. Determinants of Predisposition to Reinfection Most studies focused on the risk of A. lumbricoides reinfection, particularly reinfection predisposition relating to the initial infection status, age, and sex. Seven studies were included into the pooled estimate of effect of initial infection status on A. lumbricoides reinfection, with a fixed RR of 1.95 (95% CI: 1.62–2.34) (I 2 = 0%, χ2 = 3.63, P = 0.73) (Figure S1) [31], [44], [48], [50], [51], [53], [54]. This means that 6 months after treatment, risk of reinfection in the pretreatment-positive group was almost twice as high than that of the pretreatment-negative group (P<0.001). The pooled estimates of the risk ratios of STH reinfection between subgroups are summarized in Table 2. Overall, males had a significantly lower risk of A. lumbricoides reinfection (P<0.001), and those with heavy intensity pretreatment infection with hookworm predisposed to re-acquiring high numbers of worm after therapy (P = 0.04) [63]. 10.1371/journal.pntd.0001621.t002 Table 2 Summary estimates of the risk of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) reinfection by determinants of predisposition.* Subgroups in comparison Risk ratios (RR) of reinfection, stratified by STH species (95% CI) (number of studies) [Reference] A. lumbricoides T. trichiura Hookworm Initial infection (present vs. absent) 1.95 (1.62–2.34) (n = 7)F [31], [44], [48], [50], [51], [53], [54] 1.07 (0.41–2.80) (n = 4)R [31], [51], [53], [54] 1.57 (0.74–3.37) (n = 3)F [31], [51], [54] Initial intensity (heavy vs. light) 3.65 (1.03–12.96, P = 0·05) (n = 2)R [52], [63] 2.82 (0.62–12.75) (n = 1) [63] 2.55 (1.02,6.37) (n = 1) [63] Age (adults vs. children) 0.76 (0.52–1.12) (n = 5)R [44], [51], [54], [57], [65] 0.93 (0.31–2.81) (n = 2)R [51], [54] 1.15 (0.58–2.28) (n = 2)F [51], [54] Sex (male vs. female) 0.71 (0.61–0.83) (n = 4)F [44], [51], [54], [65] 1.06 (0.67–1.68) (n = 2)F [51], [54] 1.42 (0.91–2.19) (n = 2)F [51], [54] *: Meta-analysis of nutrient supplementation, malnutrition, health promotion, individual behavior, and family and community environment was restricted because of small sample size (i.e., number of available studies for inclusion), or because of inconsistent measures used to assess infection and/or reinfection. F Pooled estimate of fixed-effects model. R Pooled estimate of random-effects model. For some important outcome measures, it was not possible to perform meta-analyses because of the low number of studies addressing such outcomes and the broad differences in the measures and statistical methods used to assess them [79]. Of 16 studies reporting the predisposition to heavy or light intensity of infection after treatment, 15 provided significant statistics and one was depicted by column chart without any statistics [49]. Only two provided data of subgroups categorized by intensity level and could be pooled (Table 2) [52], [63]. Statistical tests in 15 studies consistently found a positive relationship between the intensity of infection pre- and posttreatment. Eleven were tested by Kendall's correlation [32], [35], [49], [52], [55]–[59], [62], [64], two by Pearson's [50], [53], one by Spearman [61], and one by χ2 [63]. Among nine studies reporting reinfection risk of infected individuals, two could not be combined due to discordant or absent statistics [49], [52]. Two studies indicated that growth-retarded children were more susceptible to STH reinfection in comparison to children with normal development [21], [39]. One randomized controlled trial indicated that multi-micronutrient fortification significantly enhanced deworming efficacy [69]. However, two randomized controlled trials separately demonstrated that supplementation of iron or multi-micronutrients in children had no significant effect, neither on prevalence nor on intensity of reinfection [19], [22], and one cross-sectional cohort study in 1- to 5-year-old children identified possible transitory benefit of vitamin A supplementation [68]. One longitudinal study in Kenyan women during pregnancy reported a positive relationship between earth-eating and STH reinfection [72]. One controlled trial in Chinese pupils assessed and quantified the impact of hand washing with soap on A. lumbricoides infection [71]. Four studies assessed the effect of sanitation to control STH reinfection [21], [27], [50], [73]. Three studies observed the seasonal fluctuations of A. lumbricoides reinfection, indicating transmission is highest when rainfall is minimal and lowest when rainfall is at its highest [29], [48]. Discussion Investigation of STH reinfection patterns following drug therapy dates back to the early 1920s [27]. However, nearly 90% (45/51) of studies included in the meta-analysis reported here were pursued in the past 30 years, suggesting their relevance to current deworming strategies and programs. Our broad-based meta-analysis shows that after targeted or mass drug administration, the prevalence of STH infections recovers rapidly in most endemic areas. Indeed, 6 months posttreatment, the prevalence of all three species reached or exceeded half the initial level; and at 12 months posttreatment follow-up, the prevalence of A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura usually returned to levels close to the initial pretreatment, while levels of hookworm reinfection continued to fluctuate at about half pretreatment level (Figure 4). The rate and intensity of initial pretreatment infection status were positively correlated with reinfection, although such predisposing effects were not as clear-cut for T. trichiura and hookworm due to limited data or discordant statistics. Publication and Selection Bias We report relatively conservative pooled effect sizes, as demonstrated through sensitivity analysis. Had case studies with poor CR, low adherence with follow-up, or low coverage for treatment been included, the projected prevalence at around 6 months posttreatment would be higher than the presented pooled estimates (Table S3) [13], [28], [32], [36], [39]. One study included in our review, but not included in pooled estimates due to the difference in follow-up interval, showed that by 9 months posttreatment, re-acquired prevalence of A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura almost reached pre-intervention levels [38]. We acknowledge that some potentially relevant studies reported in Thai, Korean, Japanese, and Portuguese, identified by hand searching reference lists of included studies, were omitted. However, we are confident that excluding these studies and unpublished studies (‘grey literature’) would not impact our conservative pooled estimates (Figure 1). Our claim is substantiated by only a modest publication bias detected by funnel plots. Assessment of Quality of Included Studies For our analysis, it was important to include the broadest range of data (i.e., covering a large time period and multiple locations) from field-based studies to develop a more general and inclusive assessment of the risk of STH reinfection after treatment. There was potential heterogeneity of individual study inclusion criteria, initial prevalence and intensity levels, CR, drug administration strategies, adherence, and coverage rates, as well as sanitation and risk behavior. During the process of heterogeneity testing and sensitivity analysis, it was found that a low adherence rate created outliers with a large effect on the pooled estimate. For this reason, the final exclusion threshold for adherence was set conservatively at 70%. A low initial prevalence of STH infections (<10%) also created outliers (but with little influence on estimates), while a low CR could directly limit effective measurement of reinfection rates within 6 months after drug administration. We therefore removed such cohorts from our final pooled estimates. Most studies on reinfection of STH are based on the infected cohort (sometimes along with the uninfected cohort). Restricted by the methods of pooled analysis, the reinfection rate of such a cohort could not be combined and compared among studies. We therefore selected PRR between posttreatment and pretreatment as the indicator for estimating risk of reinfection after drug administration, which balanced the heterogeneity of studies and made them comparable. For some pooled estimates (Figure 2), we removed several outlier studies to compare the difference between fixed- and random-effects models. We found that the random estimate was similar to that of the fixed model, with wider 95% CIs than the fixed-effects model. Main Outcomes In May 2001, at the 54th World Health Assembly, member states were urged to pursue preventive chemotherapy to control morbidity due to STH infections and schistosomiasis, mainly among school-aged children [9], [80]–[82]. Our study indicates that in endemic areas where the prevalence of STH infections is above 10%, biannual treatment might be indicated against A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura and at least one treatment per year against hookworm. The seasonality of transmission of STHs is an important factor to consider in planning and timing of preventive chemotherapy, so that the effectiveness of this control strategy can be enhanced [13], [29], [40], [48], [83]. Our study shows that the rate and intensity of reinfection are positively correlated with the initial pretreatment infection status (Table 2). Although the dynamics of STH transmission may be intricate, reinfection levels should be expected to be similar over repeated treatments if the factors responsible for predisposition to light or heavy infection are stable through time [84]. For example, in view of PRR, there was only a modest decrease after a second-round treatment compared to the initial treatment (50.6% vs. 61.8% of the initial level of pretreatment for A. lumbricoides, 33.5% vs. 46.0% for T. trichiura [34] (for details, see Table S3). Overall, the ultimate objective of preventive chemotherapy is to control morbidity rather than to interrupt transmission of STH infections [15], [52], [81]. Limitations There are limitations to this systematic review and meta-analysis, which are offered for consideration. First, epidemiological and statistical heterogeneity between studies allows possible confounding of the observed results. For example, differences in age, sex, socioeconomic and nutritional status could modify the risk of STH reinfection, which could then confound estimation of the effects of these determinants. However, details of these potentially modifying factors were not available in most of the studies included in our analysis, so adjustment was not attempted in the summary statistics. Other factors, such as diagnostic method, the frequency, approach, and efficacy of anthelmintic drugs, and length and adherence of follow-up, also varied between studies. Second, for continuous distributions, relatively large changes in average worm load could have been related to only small changes in overall prevalence such that prevalence, and hence CR, may not be the best indicator to monitor the impact of anthelmintic treatment in highly endemic areas [33], [40], [52], [76]. Indeed, it has been argued that egg reduction rate (ERR) rather than CR should be used for anthelmintic drug efficacy evaluations [85]–[87], and perhaps for studying patterns of reinfection after treatment. Intensity of infection is an important aspect of all helminthiases, but could not be well addressed in our pooled estimates. Similarly, the significant relationships between STH reinfection and socioeconomic factors could not be definitively assessed [4]. Finally, the generalized estimates from our study will probably not apply to low endemicity areas, characterized by prevalence estimates below 10%. Concluding, preventive chemotherapy with the current drugs of choice against STHs, while showing good results on morbidity reduction, does not prevent rapid reinfection [88]. Decision-makers have to make tradeoffs between benefits, cost (selected vs. mass treatment), acceptability, and harms (e.g., drug resistance) of preventive chemotherapy according the local settings [89]–[92]. Our results therefore support recommendations for integrated control approaches, complementing preventive chemotherapy with information, education, and communication (IEC) strategies, and sanitation improvement, in order to control STH infections more durably [6], [93]–[95]. The experience from the southern parts of the United States of America almost 100 years ago, as well as the Republic of Korea, P.R. China, and some parts of sub-Saharan Africa indicates that control strategies must be adapted to the prevailing social-ecological setting, and require long-term political commitment [95], [96]. In resource-limited settings, regular deworming of school-aged children is considered to be a cost-effective intervention for control of morbidity due to STH infections [9], [80], [96]. More intense treatment (e.g., twice yearly) is likely to further impact on morbidity, as seen for schistosomiasis [90], but might bear the risk of drug resistance development [91], [97]. If resources allow, efforts should be made to promote clean water, improved sanitation, health promotion in schools, and these efforts should ultimately aim at behavioral change [6], [98]–[101]. Communities living in newly industrialized countries such as P.R. China, should benefit from an integrated treatment and sanitation strategy. Hence, rather than solely being restricted to preventive chemotherapy targeting STHs and other neglected tropical diseases [102], comprehensive control requires inter-programmatic and intersectoral action for health and development [103], [104]. Supporting Information Figure S1 Forest plot of reinfection risk of individuals initially infected with Ascaris lumbricoides , 6–12 months posttreatment. Notes: A random relative risk (RR) of less than 1 indicates a lower infection rate after treatment compared to the initial level. Diamonds represent the pooled estimate across studies. See Table S1 for full references. (PDF) Click here for additional data file. Table S1 Included studies. (DOC) Click here for additional data file. Table S2 Excluded studies. (DOC) Click here for additional data file. Table S3 Studies included in our meta-analysis pertaining to reinfection patterns of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) 3–12 months posttreatment.* (DOC) Click here for additional data file. Checklist S1 PRISMA checklist. (DOC) Click here for additional data file.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ] DeWorm3, Division of Life Sciences, Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom
            [2 ] Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, United States
            [3 ] Division of Gastrointestinal Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India
            [4 ] London Centre for Neglected Tropical Disease Research, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, St. Marys Campus, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
            [5 ] Clinical Research Department, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
            [6 ] Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
            [7 ] Département de Zoologie, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Université d'Abomey-Calavi 01BP526, Cotonou, Benin
            [8 ] Blantyre Institute for Community Outreach, Lions Sight First Eye Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi
            [9 ] MERIT UMR 216, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Paris, France
            [10 ] Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, Seattle, United States
            Ministère de la Santé Publique et de la Lutte contre les Endémies, NIGER
            Author notes

            The study is funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The funders reviewed but were not involved in final decisions regarding the study design and trial procedures. The funders were not involved in the decision to publish the manuscript and will have no role in data collection, analysis or publication of study results.

            ¶ Membership of the DeWorm3 Trials Team is provided in the Members of the DeWorm3 Trials Team section.

            Contributors
            ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3263-3457, Role: Methodology, Role: Writing – original draft, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Investigation, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Methodology, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Investigation, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Project administration
            Role: Methodology, Role: Project administration
            Role: Investigation, Role: Project administration
            Role: Project administration
            Role: Investigation
            Role: Project administration, Role: Resources, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Investigation, Role: Methodology, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Methodology, Role: Writing – original draft, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Data curation, Role: Methodology, Role: Software
            Role: Investigation, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Investigation, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Project administration, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Methodology
            Role: Methodology
            Role: Methodology, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Project administration
            Role: Conceptualization, Role: Funding acquisition, Role: Methodology, Role: Writing – original draft, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Editor
            Journal
            PLoS Negl Trop Dis
            PLoS Negl Trop Dis
            plos
            plosntds
            PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
            Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
            1935-2727
            1935-2735
            18 January 2018
            January 2018
            : 12
            : 1
            29346377 5773085 10.1371/journal.pntd.0006166 PNTD-D-17-01211
            © 2018 Ásbjörnsdóttir et al

            This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

            Counts
            Figures: 4, Tables: 2, Pages: 16
            Product
            Funding
            Funded by: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (US)
            Award ID: OPP1129535
            Award Recipient :
            The DeWorm3 study is funded through a grant to the Natural History Museum, London from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (OPP1129535, PI JLW). The funders reviewed but were not involved in final decisions regarding the study design and trial procedures. The funders were not involved in the decision to publish the manuscript and will have no role in data collection, analysis or publication of study results.
            Categories
            Research Article
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Parasitic Diseases
            Helminth Infections
            Soil-Transmitted Helminthiases
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Tropical Diseases
            Neglected Tropical Diseases
            Soil-Transmitted Helminthiases
            Research and Analysis Methods
            Research Design
            Survey Research
            Census
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            Asia
            India
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Health Care
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            People and Places
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            Africa
            Benin
            People and Places
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            Africa
            Malawi
            Social Sciences
            Sociology
            Education
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            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Pharmaceutics
            Drug Therapy
            Drug Administration
            Custom metadata
            All relevant data are within the paper.

            Infectious disease & Microbiology

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