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      Longest continuously erupting large igneous province driven by plume-ridge interaction

      1 , 1 , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5
      Geology
      Geological Society of America

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          Abstract

          Large igneous provinces (LIPs) typically form in one short pulse of ~1–5 Ma or several punctuated ~1–5 Ma pulses. Here, our 25 new 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages for the main construct of the Kerguelen LIP—the Cretaceous Southern and Central Kerguelen Plateau, Elan Bank, and Broken Ridge—show continuous volcanic activity from ca. 122 to 90 Ma, a long lifespan of >32 Ma. This suggests that the Kerguelen LIP records the longest, continuous high-magma-flux emplacement interval of any LIP. Distinct from both short-lived and multiple-pulsed LIPs, we propose that Kerguelen is a different type of LIP that formed through long-term interactions between a mantle plume and mid-ocean ridge, which is enabled by multiple ridge jumps, slow spreading, and migration of the ridge. Such processes allow the transport of magma products away from the eruption center and result in long-lived, continuous magmatic activity.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Geology
          Geological Society of America
          0091-7613
          1943-2682
          October 07 2020
          October 07 2020
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Western Australian Argon Isotope Facility, John de Laeter Centre and School of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845, Australia
          [2 ]Timescales of Mineral Systems, Centre for Exploration Targeting–Curtin Node, School of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845, Australia
          [3 ]Swedish Museum of Natural History, S-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden
          [4 ]Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, 75236 Uppsala, Sweden
          [5 ]Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
          Article
          10.1130/G47850.1
          7bcc22cf-97a5-4651-92d3-5259b7a4ab94
          © 2020
          History

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