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      Tolerance assessment of the aquatic invasive snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to different post-dispersive conditions: implications for its invasive success

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      NeoBiota

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          The New Zealand mudsnail (NZMS) Potamopyrgusantipodarum (Gray, 1843) (Tateidae, Mollusca) is a successful invasive species able to alter the functioning of the invaded ecosystems. However, to arrive and establish in new aquatic ecosystems, this snail must survive to the overland translocation through aerial exposure and must tolerate the new physical and chemical conditions of the recipient ecosystem. In this study, we simulated different conditions for the NZMS invasion by combining two air exposure treatments (0 and 20 h) with different physical and chemical conditions of the rehydration water (low and normal water temperatures and normal and high water conductivities). Mortality, behavior and neonate production were compared across treatments. Air exposure caused a high percentage of mortality but survivors tolerated the subsequent abiotic conditions. Low temperatures and high conductivities altered the behavior of adult snails, increasing significantly their reaction time (i.e. time to start normal movement). This may have negative consequences for the survival of this species under natural conditions. Finally, these conditions did not affect significantly the production of neonates. These results supported that the surviving NZMS to a brief period of air exposure possess the ability to acclimate to contrasting abiotic conditions with a potential establishment of new populations and that survivors can reproduce in different abiotic conditions after an air exposure period.

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          Most cited references 36

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          Predicting impact of freshwater exotic species on native biodiversity: Challenges in spatial scaling

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              Extremely high secondary production of introduced snails in rivers.

              The functional importance of invasive animals may be measured as the degree to which they dominate secondary production, relative to native animals. We used this approach to examine dominance of invertebrate secondary production by invasive New Zealand mudsnails (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) in rivers. We measured secondary production of mudsnails and native invertebrates in three rivers in the Greater Yellowstone Area (Wyoming, USA): Gibbon River, Firehole River, and Polecat Creek. Potamopyrgus production was estimated by measuring in situ growth rates and multiplying by monthly biomass; native invertebrate production was estimated using size frequency and instantaneous growth methods. Mudsnail growth rates were high (up to 0.06 d(-1)) for juvenile snails and much lower for adult females (0.003 d(-1)). Potamopyrgus production in Polecat Creek (194 g x m(-2) x yr(-1)) was one of the highest values ever reported for a stream invertebrate. Native invertebrate production ranged from 4.4 to 51 g x m(-2) x yr(-1). Potamopyrgus was the most productive taxon and constituted 65-92% of total invertebrate productivity. Native invertebrate production was low in all streams. Based on a survey of production measures from uninvaded rivers, the distribution of secondary production across taxa was much more highly skewed toward the invasive dominant Potamopyrgus in the three rivers. We suggest that this invasive herbivorous snail is sequestering a large fraction of the carbon available for invertebrate production and altering food web function.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                NeoBiota
                NB
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2488
                1619-0033
                April 05 2019
                April 05 2019
                : 44
                : 57-73
                Article
                10.3897/neobiota.44.31840
                © 2019

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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