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      AIRBORNE TRANSMISSION VIA HVAC OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN MILITARY FACILITIES? : Review of a Basic Training Cohort Study

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          Abstract

          There is great interest in preventing the spread of acute respiratory infections (ARI) in military housing and in other facilities with multiple occupants such as hospitals. There has been some research on the mode of transmission of ARIs in these types of occupancies, with several studies focusing on direct and indirect contact. This study, based on several barracks at the largest basic training facility for the Army in the United States, investigates the role of airborne transmission via heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems as compared to a combination of airborne, indirect contact and direct contact transmission in a room. The results indicate that there is a significant increase in the number of cases which might be attributable to airborne transmission via HVAC systems in several situations, both for ARIs that required hospitalization, and those which did not.

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          Most cited references 14

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          Epidemiology of viral respiratory infections.

           Arnold Monto (2002)
          Acute respiratory tract infections are the most common illnesses in all individuals, regardless of age or gender. Epidemiologic surveys and community-based studies conducted since the beginning of the 20th century have determined the rates of illness and the pathogens involved in such infections. These studies have shown that rhinoviruses cause the great majority of these respiratory illnesses, and their findings have examined the means of transmission of respiratory illness. More recently, advances in diagnostic techniques have enabled more complete identification of the viruses involved in respiratory infections, which has aided in the ability to direct specific therapeutic agents at the causative pathogens.
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            IN2: THE ECONOMIC BURDEN OF VIRAL RESPIRATORY INFECTION IN THE UNITED STATES

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              ‘Building-associated risk of febrile acute respiratory diseases in Army trainees’

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1552-6100
                1943-4618
                1943-4618
                Winter 2009
                : 4
                : 1
                : 114-120
                Author notes

                1Civil and Environmental Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2910, haselbach@ 123456wsu.edu , (509) 335-4874.

                2Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208.

                3Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, 20814.

                Article
                jgb.4.1.114
                10.3992/jgb.4.1.114
                ©2009 by College Publishing. All rights reserved.

                Volumes 1-7 of JOGB are open access and do not require permission for use, though proper citation should be given. To view the licenses, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                Page count
                Pages: 7
                Product
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLES

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