20
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Socioeconomic Differences in Adolescent Health-Related Behavior Differ by Gender

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Many studies of adolescent health-related behaviors have assessed the effects of gender and parental socioeconomic position (SEP) but not their mutual modification. We investigated socioeconomic differences in health-related behaviors among Slovak adolescents and the potential modification of those differences by gender.

          Methods

          Data were collected in 2006 ( n = 3547; 49.4% boys; mean [SD] age, 14.3 [0.6] years; response rate, 93.5%). The sample comprised students in the eighth and ninth grades of randomly selected elementary schools in Slovakia. Gender-specific prevalence rates for 9 types of health-related behaviors, including nutritional behavior, physical activity and substance use, were calculated for 3 socioeconomic groups, which were defined by the highest educational level attained by both parents. Gender differences in socioeconomic gradients for health-related behaviors were tested.

          Results

          Socioeconomic differences were found in nutritional behavior, physical activity, and smoking. Adolescents with lower parental education behaved less healthily. The largest relative socioeconomic difference was no daily vegetable consumption among girls (90.3% of those with high SEP vs 95.2% of those with middle SEP; odds ratio, 2.33). Regarding no daily fruit consumption, differences among girls were 1.51 times and 1.92 times as large as those among boys for children with medium and low SEP, respectively, as compared with those with high SEP.

          Conclusions

          Socioeconomic differences in health-related behavior were small, especially for nutritional behavior and physical activity. Interventions that aim to improve health-related behaviors among adolescents with lower SEP should focus on these 2 behaviors, particularly on healthy nutrition in girls with low SEP.

          Related collections

          Most cited references31

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Indicators of socioeconomic status for adolescents: the WHO Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey.

          Many indicators of socioeconomic status used for adults are inappropriate for use in research on adolescents. In a school-based survey of 4079 Scottish schoolchildren using a self-completion questionnaire, over 20% of 11-15 year olds were unable to provide a substantive response on father's occupation. In contrast, indicators derived to construct a family affluence scale, which included car ownership, telephone ownership and the child having their own unshared bedroom, resulted in a 98% response rate; and 92% of children responded to a question on their weekly spending money. The intercorrelations between the conventional indicator of father's occupation and each family affluence and spending money were examined, and their associations with a range of health indicators and health behaviour measures compared. Father's occupational status and family affluence were moderately correlated and showed broadly similar patterns of association with the selected health measures although there were also some distinct differences. Child's spending money was only weakly correlated with father's occupation and showed rather different patterns of association with health measures. A case is made for the use of multiple indicators of socioeconomic status in adolescent health surveys, and it is argued that that the family affluence scale provides a useful and easily applied additional indicator to father's occupation or an alternative measure of socioeconomic background where occupational data are unavailable.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Assessment of factors affecting the validity of self-reported health-risk behavior among adolescents: evidence from the scientific literature.

            We reviewed the existing empirical literature to assess cognitive and situational factors that may affect the validity of adolescents' self-reports of alcohol and other drug use, tobacco use, behaviors related to unintentional injuries and violence, dietary behaviors, physical activity, and sexual behavior. Specifically, we searched for peer-reviewed journal articles published in 1980 or later that examined the factors affecting self-report of the six categories of behavior listed above. We also searched for studies describing objective measures for each behavior. Self-reports of each of six types of health-risk behaviors are affected by both cognitive and situational factors. These factors, however, do not threaten the validity of self-reports of each type of behavior equally. The importance of assessing health-risk behaviors as part of research activities involving adolescents necessitates the use of self-report measures. Researchers should familiarize themselves with the threats to validity inherent in this type of assessment and design research that minimizes these threats as much as possible.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Close friend and group influence on adolescent cigarette smoking and alcohol use.

              The relative influence of adolescents closest friends and their friendship group on their cigarette smoking and alcohol use was investigated in a short-term, longitudinal study of 1,028 students in the 6th, 8th, and 10th grades in 2 school systems. The amount of influence over the school year was modest in magnitude and came from the closest friend for initiation of cigarette and alcohol use. Only the friendship group use predicted transition into current cigarette use, whereas only the close friend use predicted transition into current alcohol use. Both group and close friends independently contributed to the prediction of adolescents' drinking to intoxication. No difference in the amount of influence, was found between stable and unstable close friendships or friendship groups; neither grade nor gender of the adolescents related to the amount of influence.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Epidemiol
                J Epidemiol
                JE
                Journal of Epidemiology
                Japan Epidemiological Association
                0917-5040
                1349-9092
                5 May 2013
                20 April 2013
                2013
                : 23
                : 3
                : 211-218
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Institute of Experimental Psychology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia
                [2 ]Graduate School Kosice Institute for Society and Health, Medical Faculty, PJ Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia
                [3 ]Public Health Institute, Department of Health Psychology, Medical Faculty, PJ Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia
                [4 ]Department of Social Medicine, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
                Author notes
                Address for correspondence. Lukas Pitel, MSc, Institute of Experimental Psychology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 81364 Bratislava, Slovakia (e-mail: lukas.pitel@ 123456savba.sk ).
                Article
                JE20120133
                10.2188/jea.JE20120133
                3700252
                23604059
                7c24868b-c636-4f66-86cb-cae19d7e8f3b
                © 2013 Japan Epidemiological Association.

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                History
                : 30 June 2012
                : 14 December 2012
                Categories
                Original Article

                gender differences,socioeconomic differences,adolescents,health-related behavior

                Comments

                Comment on this article