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      Electromagnetic interference shielding with 2D transition metal carbides (MXenes)

      , , , , , ,
      Science
      American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

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          Broadband and tunable high-performance microwave absorption of an ultralight and highly compressible graphene foam.

          The broadband and tunable high-performance microwave absorption properties of an ultralight and highly compressible graphene foam (GF) are investigated. Simply via physical compression, the microwave absorption performance can be tuned. The qualified bandwidth coverage of 93.8% (60.5 GHz/64.5 GHz) is achieved for the GF under 90% compressive strain (1.0 mm thickness). This mainly because of the 3D conductive network.
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            Two-Dimensional, Ordered, Double Transition Metals Carbides (MXenes).

            The higher the chemical diversity and structural complexity of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the higher the likelihood they possess unique and useful properties. Herein, density functional theory (DFT) is used to predict the existence of two new families of 2D ordered, carbides (MXenes), M'2M″C2 and M'2M″2C3, where M' and M″ are two different early transition metals. In these solids, M' layers sandwich M″ carbide layers. By synthesizing Mo2TiC2Tx, Mo2Ti2C3Tx, and Cr2TiC2Tx (where T is a surface termination), we validated the DFT predictions. Since the Mo and Cr atoms are on the outside, they control the 2D flakes' chemical and electrochemical properties. The latter was proven by showing quite different electrochemical behavior of Mo2TiC2Tx and Ti3C2Tx. This work further expands the family of 2D materials, offering additional choices of structures, chemistries, and ultimately useful properties.
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              A major constituent of brown algae for use in high-capacity Li-ion batteries.

              The identification of similarities in the material requirements for applications of interest and those of living organisms provides opportunities to use renewable natural resources to develop better materials and design better devices. In our work, we harness this strategy to build high-capacity silicon (Si) nanopowder-based lithium (Li)-ion batteries with improved performance characteristics. Si offers more than one order of magnitude higher capacity than graphite, but it exhibits dramatic volume changes during electrochemical alloying and de-alloying with Li, which typically leads to rapid anode degradation. We show that mixing Si nanopowder with alginate, a natural polysaccharide extracted from brown algae, yields a stable battery anode possessing reversible capacity eight times higher than that of the state-of-the-art graphitic anodes.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Science
                Science
                American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
                0036-8075
                1095-9203
                September 08 2016
                September 08 2016
                : 353
                : 6304
                : 1137-1140
                Article
                10.1126/science.aag2421
                27609888
                7c8269bd-08de-41d7-8731-ac95463f142a
                © 2016

                http://www.sciencemag.org/about/science-licenses-journal-article-reuse

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