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      Human stem cell-derived spinal cord astrocytes with defined mature or reactive phenotypes.

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          Abstract

          Differentiation of astrocytes from human stem cells has significant potential for analysis of their role in normal brain function and disease, but existing protocols generate only immature astrocytes. Using early neuralization, we generated spinal cord astrocytes from mouse or human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells with high efficiency. Remarkably, short exposure to fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) or FGF2 was sufficient to direct these astrocytes selectively toward a mature quiescent phenotype, as judged by both marker expression and functional analysis. In contrast, tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1β, but not FGFs, induced multiple elements of a reactive inflammatory phenotype but did not affect maturation. These phenotypically defined, scalable populations of spinal cord astrocytes will be important both for studying normal astrocyte function and for modeling human pathological processes in vitro.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Cell Rep
          Cell reports
          2211-1247
          Sep 12 2013
          : 4
          : 5
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Project A.L.S./Jenifer Estess Laboratory for Stem Cell Research, Columbia University Medical Center, P&S 16-440, 630 West 168(th) Street, New York, NY 10032, USA; Columbia Stem Cell Initiative (CSCI), Departments of Pathology and Cell Biology and Neurology, Center for Motor Neuron Biology and Disease (MNC), Columbia University Medical Center, P&S 5-420, 630 West 168(th) Street, New York, NY 10032, USA.
          Article
          S2211-1247(13)00313-6 NIHMS500616
          10.1016/j.celrep.2013.06.021
          23994478
          7cce8423-4d7e-43bf-8ee7-5936c7122007
          Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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