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      Laparoscopic resection of large gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours

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          Abstract

          Introduction

          Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are a rare class of neoplasms that are seen most commonly in the stomach. Due to their malignant potential, surgical resection is the recommended method for management of these tumours. Many reports have described the ability to excise small and medium sized GISTs laparoscopically, but laparoscopic resection of GISTs greater than 5 cm is still a matter of debate.

          Aim

          To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of laparoscopic surgical techniques for management of large gastric GISTs greater than 4 cm and to detail characteristics of this type of tumour.

          Material and methods

          The study cohort consisted of 11 patients with suspected gastric GISTs who were treated from 2011 to April 2014 in a single institution. All patients underwent laparoscopic resection of a gastric GIST.

          Results

          Eleven patients underwent laparoscopic resection of a suspected gastric GIST between April 2011 and April 2014. The cohort consisted of 6 males and 5 females. Mean age was 67 years (range: 43–92 years). Sixty-four percent of these patients presented with symptomatic tumours. Four (36.4%) patients underwent laparoscopic transgastric resection (LTR), 3 (27.3%) laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), 3 (27.3%) laparoscopic wedge resection (LWR) and 1 (9%) laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (LDG). The mean operative time was 215 min. The mean tumour size was 6 cm (range: 4–9 cm). The mean tumour size for LTR was 5.5 cm (range: 4–6.3 cm), for LWR 5.3 cm (range: 4.5–7 cm), for LSG 6.5 cm (range: 4–9 cm) and for LDG 9 cm. We experienced only minor postoperative complications.

          Conclusions

          Laparoscopic procedures can be successfully performed during management of large gastric GISTs, bigger than 4 cm, and should be considered for all non-metastatic cases. The appropriate approach can be determined by assessing the anatomical location of each tumour.

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          Most cited references 25

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          Diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors: A consensus approach.

          As a result of major recent advances in understanding the biology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), specifically recognition of the central role of activating KIT mutations and associated KIT protein expression in these lesions, and the development of novel and effective therapy for GISTs using the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI-571, these tumors have become the focus of considerable attention by pathologists, clinicians, and patients. Stromal/mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract have long been a source of confusion and controversy with regard to classification, line(s) of differentiation, and prognostication. Characterization of the KIT pathway and its phenotypic implications has helped to resolve some but not all of these issues. Given the now critical role of accurate and reproducible pathologic diagnosis in ensuring appropriate treatment for patients with GIST, the National Institutes of Health convened a GIST workshop in April 2001 with the goal of developing a consensus approach to diagnosis and morphologic prognostication. Key elements of the consensus, as described herein, are the defining role of KIT immunopositivity in diagnosis and a proposed scheme for estimating metastatic risk in these lesions, based on tumor size and mitotic count, recognizing that it is probably unwise to use the definitive term "benign" for any GIST, at least at the present time. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.
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            Two hundred gastrointestinal stromal tumors: recurrence patterns and prognostic factors for survival.

            To analyze the outcome of 200 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who were treated at a single institution and followed up prospectively. A GIST is a visceral sarcoma that arises from the gastrointestinal tract. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment because adjuvant therapy is unproven. Two hundred patients with malignant GIST were admitted and treated at Memorial Hospital during the past 16 years. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables were analyzed to identify patterns of tumor recurrence and factors that predict survival. Of the 200 patients, 46% had primary disease without metastasis, 47% had metastasis, and 7% had isolated local recurrence. In patients with primary disease who underwent complete resection of gross disease (n = 80), the 5-year actuarial survival rate was 54%, and survival was predicted by tumor size but not microscopic margins of resection. Recurrence of disease after resection was predominantly intraabdominal and involved the original tumor site, peritoneum, and liver. GISTs are uncommon sarcomas. Tumor size predicts disease-specific survival in patients with primary disease who undergo complete gross resection. Tumor recurrence tends to be intraabdominal. Investigational protocols are indicated to reduce the rate of recurrence after resection and to improve the outcome for patients with GIST.
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              Clinical practice guidelines for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in Japan: English version.

              Diagnostic and treatment strategies for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have evolved greatly since the introduction of molecularly targeted therapies. Although several clinical practice guidelines are extant, such as those published by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and the European Society of Medical Oncology, it is not clear as to whether these are appropriate for clinical practice in Japan. Therefore, clinical practice guidelines for the optimal diagnosis and treatment of GIST tailored for the Japanese situation have often been requested. For this reason, the Japanese Clinical Practice Guideline for GIST was proposed by the GIST Guideline Subcommittee, with the official approval of the Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee for Cancer of the Japan Society of Clinical Oncology (JSCO), and was published after assessment by the Guideline Evaluation Committee of JSCO. The GIST Guideline Subcommittee consists of members from JSCO, the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association (JGCA), and the Japanese Study Group on GIST, with the official approval of these organizations. The GIST Guideline Subcommittee is not influenced by any other organizations or third parties. Revision of the guideline may be done periodically, with the approval of the GIST Guideline Subcommittee, either every 3 years or when important new evidence that might alter the optimal diagnosis and treatment of GIST emerges. Here we present the English version of the Japanese Clinical Practice Guideline for GIST prepared by the GIST Guideline Subcommittee.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Wideochir Inne Tech Maloinwazyjne
                Wideochir Inne Tech Maloinwazyjne
                WIITM
                Videosurgery and other Miniinvasive Techniques
                Termedia Publishing House
                1895-4588
                2299-0054
                16 December 2015
                2016
                : 11
                : 1
                : 31-37
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Connolly Hospital, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland
                [2 ]Beaumont Hospital, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland
                [3 ]Saint John of God Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
                Author notes
                Address for correspondence Sebastian Smolarek MD, Connolly Hospital, Blanchardstown, Dublin 15, Ireland. e-mail: sebastian.smolarek79@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                26396
                10.5114/wiitm.2015.56489
                4840182
                Copyright © 2015 Sekcja Wideochirurgii TChP

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) License, allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and to remix, transform, and build upon the material, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license.

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