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      Race, Gender, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in the U.S. Military : Differential Vulnerability?

      1 , 2

      Armed Forces & Society

      SAGE Publications

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          THE ROLES OF COMBAT EXPOSURE, PERSONAL VULNERABILITY, AND INVOLVEMENT IN HARM TO CIVILIANS OR PRISONERS IN VIETNAM WAR-RELATED POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER.

          The diagnosis, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, was introduced in 1980 amidst debate about the psychiatric toll of the Vietnam War. There is controversy, however, about its central assumption that potentially traumatic stressors are more important than personal vulnerability in causing the disorder. We tested this assumption with data from a rigorously diagnosed male subsample (n = 260) from the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study. Combat exposure, pre-war vulnerability, and involvement in harming civilians or prisoners were examined, with only combat exposure proving necessary for disorder onset. While none of the three factors proved sufficient, estimated onset reached 97% for veterans high on all three, with harm to civilians or prisoners showing the largest independent contribution. Severity of combat exposure proved more important than pre-war vulnerability in onset; pre-war vulnerability at least as important in long-term persistence. Implications for the primacy of the stressor assumption, further research, and policy are discussed.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            Armed Forces & Society
            Armed Forces & Society
            SAGE Publications
            0095-327X
            1556-0848
            March 2017
            April 2017
            July 27 2016
            April 2017
            : 43
            : 2
            : 322-345
            Affiliations
            [1 ]Department of Sociology, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, USA
            [2 ]Department of Sociology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA
            Article
            10.1177/0095327X16652610
            © 2017

            http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license

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