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      Circulating Human CD27-IgA+ Memory B Cells Recognize Bacteria with Polyreactive Igs.

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          Abstract

          The vast majority of IgA production occurs in mucosal tissue following T cell-dependent and T cell-independent Ag responses. To study the nature of each of these responses, we analyzed the gene-expression and Ig-reactivity profiles of T cell-dependent CD27(+)IgA(+) and T cell-independent CD27(-)IgA(+) circulating memory B cells. Gene-expression profiles of IgA(+) subsets were highly similar to each other and to IgG(+) memory B cell subsets, with typical upregulation of activation markers and downregulation of inhibitory receptors. However, we identified the mucosa-associated CCR9 and RUNX2 genes to be specifically upregulated in CD27(-)IgA(+) B cells. We also found that CD27(-)IgA(+) B cells expressed Abs with distinct Ig repertoire and reactivity compared with those from CD27(+)IgA(+) B cells. Indeed, Abs from CD27(-)IgA(+) B cells were weakly mutated, often used Igλ chain, and were enriched in polyreactive clones recognizing various bacterial species. Hence, T cell-independent IgA responses are likely involved in the maintenance of gut homeostasis through the production of polyreactive mutated IgA Abs with cross-reactive anti-commensal reactivity.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J. Immunol.
          Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)
          1550-6606
          0022-1767
          Aug 15 2015
          : 195
          : 4
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Immunology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, 3015 CN Rotterdam, the Netherlands;
          [2 ] Department of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511; and.
          [3 ] The Delft Bioinformatics Lab, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics, and Computer Science, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CD Delft, the Netherlands.
          [4 ] Department of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511; and m.vanzelm@erasmusmc.nl eric.meffre@yale.edu.
          [5 ] Department of Immunology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, 3015 CN Rotterdam, the Netherlands; m.vanzelm@erasmusmc.nl eric.meffre@yale.edu.
          Article
          jimmunol.1402708 NIHMS700876
          10.4049/jimmunol.1402708
          4595932
          26150533
          Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

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