42
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Oomycete pathogens encode RNA silencing suppressors.

      Nature genetics

      Gene Expression Regulation, Host-Pathogen Interactions, genetics, immunology, Infection, parasitology, Phytophthora, metabolism, pathogenicity, Plant Diseases, Plants, Proteins, RNA Interference, Signal Transduction, Virulence

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Effectors are essential virulence proteins produced by a broad range of parasites, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, protozoa, insects and nematodes. Upon entry into host cells, pathogen effectors manipulate specific physiological processes or signaling pathways to subvert host immunity. Most effectors, especially those of eukaryotic pathogens, remain functionally uncharacterized. Here, we show that two effectors from the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora sojae suppress RNA silencing in plants by inhibiting the biogenesis of small RNAs. Ectopic expression of these Phytophthora suppressors of RNA silencing enhances plant susceptibility to both a virus and Phytophthora, showing that some eukaryotic pathogens have evolved virulence proteins that target host RNA silencing processes to promote infection. These findings identify RNA silencing suppression as a common strategy used by pathogens across kingdoms to cause disease and are consistent with RNA silencing having key roles in host defense.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 31

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Origin, biogenesis, and activity of plant microRNAs.

          MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key posttranscriptional regulators of eukaryotic gene expression. Plants use highly conserved as well as more recently evolved, species-specific miRNAs to control a vast array of biological processes. This Review discusses current advances in our understanding of the origin, biogenesis, and mode of action of plant miRNAs and draws comparisons with their metazoan counterparts.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Phytophthora genome sequences uncover evolutionary origins and mechanisms of pathogenesis.

            Draft genome sequences have been determined for the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae and the sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. Oömycetes such as these Phytophthora species share the kingdom Stramenopila with photosynthetic algae such as diatoms, and the presence of many Phytophthora genes of probable phototroph origin supports a photosynthetic ancestry for the stramenopiles. Comparison of the two species' genomes reveals a rapid expansion and diversification of many protein families associated with plant infection such as hydrolases, ABC transporters, protein toxins, proteinase inhibitors, and, in particular, a superfamily of 700 proteins with similarity to known oömycete avirulence genes.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              RNA-based antiviral immunity.

               Wei-Qun Ding (2010)
              In eukaryotic RNA-based antiviral immunity, viral double-stranded RNA is recognized as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern and processed into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by the host ribonuclease Dicer. After amplification by host RNA-dependent RNA polymerases in some cases, these virus-derived siRNAs guide specific antiviral immunity through RNA interference and related RNA silencing effector mechanisms. Here, I review recent studies on the features of viral siRNAs and other virus-derived small RNAs from virus-infected fungi, plants, insects, nematodes and vertebrates and discuss the innate and adaptive properties of RNA-based antiviral immunity.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                23377181
                4049077
                10.1038/ng.2525

                Comments

                Comment on this article