Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found
      Is Open Access

      Crossing the ice: an Iron Age to medieval mountain pass at Lendbreen, Norway

      , ,

      Antiquity

      Antiquity Publications

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Abstract

          Mountain passes have played a key role in past mobility, facilitating transhumance, intra-regional travel and long-distance exchange. Current global warming has revealed an example of such a pass at Lendbreen, Norway. Artefacts exposed by the melting ice indicate usage from c. AD 300–1500, with a peak in activity c. AD 1000 during the Viking Age—a time of increased mobility, political centralisation and growing trade and urbanisation in Northern Europe. Lendbreen provides new information concerning the socio-economic factors that influenced high-elevation travel, and increases our understanding of the role of mountain passes in inter- and intra-regional communication and exchange.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 25

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          IntCal13 and Marine13 Radiocarbon Age Calibration Curves 0–50,000 Years cal BP

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Cooling and societal change during the Late Antique Little Ice Age from 536 to around 660 AD

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Methods for Summarizing Radiocarbon Datasets

              Bayesian models have proved very powerful in analyzing large datasets of radiocarbon ( 14 C) measurements from specific sites and in regional cultural or political models. These models require the prior for the underlying processes that are being described to be defined, including the distribution of underlying events. Chronological information is also incorporated into Bayesian models used in DNA research, with the use of Skyline plots to show demographic trends. Despite these advances, there remain difficulties in assessing whether data conform to the assumed underlying models, and in dealing with the type of artifacts seen in Sum plots. In addition, existing methods are not applicable for situations where it is not possible to quantify the underlying process, or where sample selection is thought to have filtered the data in a way that masks the original event distribution. In this paper three different approaches are compared: “Sum” distributions, postulated undated events, and kernel density approaches. Their implementation in the OxCal program is described and their suitability for visualizing the results from chronological and geographic analyses considered for cases with and without useful prior information. The conclusion is that kernel density analysis is a powerful method that could be much more widely applied in a wide range of dating applications.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Antiquity
                Antiquity
                Antiquity Publications
                0003-598X
                1745-1744
                April 2020
                April 16 2020
                April 2020
                : 94
                : 374
                : 437-454
                Article
                10.15184/aqy.2020.2
                © 2020

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Comments

                Comment on this article