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      Linking long-term dietary patterns with gut microbial enterotypes.

      Science (New York, N.Y.)

      Young Adult, Time Factors, isolation & purification, classification, Ruminococcus, Prevotella, Middle Aged, Metagenome, Humans, microbiology, Gastrointestinal Tract, Feces, administration & dosage, Dietary Fiber, Dietary Fats, Dietary Carbohydrates, Diet, Cross-Sectional Studies, Child, Preschool, Child, Bacteroides, Bacteria, Adult, Adolescent

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          Abstract

          Diet strongly affects human health, partly by modulating gut microbiome composition. We used diet inventories and 16S rDNA sequencing to characterize fecal samples from 98 individuals. Fecal communities clustered into enterotypes distinguished primarily by levels of Bacteroides and Prevotella. Enterotypes were strongly associated with long-term diets, particularly protein and animal fat (Bacteroides) versus carbohydrates (Prevotella). A controlled-feeding study of 10 subjects showed that microbiome composition changed detectably within 24 hours of initiating a high-fat/low-fiber or low-fat/high-fiber diet, but that enterotype identity remained stable during the 10-day study. Thus, alternative enterotype states are associated with long-term diet.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          21885731
          3368382
          10.1126/science.1208344

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