11
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      A pilot study of rapid hepatitis C virus testing in the Rhode Island Department of Corrections.

      Journal of Public Health (Oxford, England)
      Oxford University Press (OUP)
      linkage to care, rapid HCV antibody test, hepatitis C virus, jail/prison

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The correctional population bears a heavy burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection necessitating expansion of HCV testing and treatment opportunities. Rapid HCV testing provides point-of-care antibody results and may be ideal for correctional facilities, particularly jails, where persons are often incarcerated for short periods of time, yet feasibility has not been established.

          Related collections

          Most cited references27

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Diagnosis, management, and treatment of hepatitis C: an update.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Chronic hepatitis C virus infection in the United States, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003 to 2010.

            Knowledge of the number of persons with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the United States is critical for public health and policy planning. To estimate the prevalence of chronic HCV infection between 2003 and 2010 and to identify factors associated with this condition. Nationally representative household survey. U.S. noninstitutionalized civilian population. 30,074 NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) participants between 2003 and 2010. Interviews to ascertain demographic characteristics and possible risks and exposures for HCV infection. Serum samples from participants aged 6 years or older were tested for antibody to HCV; if results were positive or indeterminate, the samples were tested for HCV RNA, which indicates current chronic infection. Based on 273 participants who tested positive for HCV RNA, the estimated prevalence of HCV infection was 1.0% (95% CI, 0.8% to 1.2%), corresponding to 2.7 million chronically infected persons (CI, 2.2 to 3.2 million persons) in the U.S. noninstitutionalized civilian population. Infected persons were more likely to be aged 40 to 59 years, male, and non-Hispanic black and to have less education and lower family income. Factors significantly associated with chronic HCV infection were illicit drug use (including injection drugs) and receipt of a blood transfusion before 1992; 49% of persons with HCV infection did not report either risk factor. Incarcerated and homeless persons were not surveyed. This analysis estimated that approximately 2.7 million U.S. residents in the population sampled by NHANES have chronic HCV infection, about 500,000 fewer than estimated in a similar analysis between 1999 and 2002. These data underscore the urgency of identifying the millions of persons who remain infected and linking them to appropriate care and treatment. None.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              The increasing burden of mortality from viral hepatitis in the United States between 1999 and 2007.

              The increasing health burden and mortality from hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the United States are underappreciated. To examine mortality from HBV; HCV; and, for comparison, HIV. Analysis of U.S. multiple-cause mortality data from 1999 to 2007 from the National Center for Health Statistics. All U.S. states and the District of Columbia. Approximately 22 million decedents. Age-adjusted mortality rates from HBV, HCV, and HIV. Logistic regression analyses of 2007 data generated 4 independent models per outcome (HCV- or HBV-related deaths) that each included 1 of 4 comorbid conditions and all sociodemographic characteristics. Between 1999 and 2007, recorded deaths from HCV [corrected] increased significantly to 15,106, whereas deaths from HIV declined to 12,734 by 2007. Factors associated with HCV-related deaths included chronic liver disease, HBV co-infection, alcohol-related conditions, minority status, and HIV co-infection. Factors that increased odds of HBV-related death included chronic liver disease, HCV co-infection, Asian or Pacific Islander descent, HIV co-infection, and alcohol-related conditions. Most deaths from HBV and HCV occurred in middle-aged persons. A person other than the primary physician of the decedent frequently completed the death certificate, and HCV and HBV often were not detected and thus not reported as causes of death. By 2007, HCV had superseded HIV as a cause of death in the United States, and deaths from HCV and HBV disproportionately occurred in middle-aged persons. To achieve decreases in mortality similar to those seen with HIV requires new policy initiatives to detect patients with chronic hepatitis and link them to care and treatment. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                25736438
                4750523
                10.1093/pubmed/fdv023

                linkage to care, rapid HCV antibody test,hepatitis C virus,jail/prison

                Comments

                Comment on this article