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      Necrophagous Fly Assembly: Evaluation of Species Bait Preference in Field Experiments

      1 , 1 , 2 , 1 , 2
      Journal of Medical Entomology
      Oxford University Press (OUP)

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          Abstract

          The assembly of species that colonize animal organic matter, their relative abundance, and dynamics are affected by the environmental and biogeographical conditions to which these resources are exposed. Baited trap studies are essential for research on the diversity, seasonality, distribution and population dynamics of necrophagous flies. Decomposing baits provide the necessary stimulus for flies to aggregate on them. In this study, three types of bait of animal origin with different organic chemical composition were compared in terms of the diversity, richness, abundance, and species composition of saprophagous flies species that were attracted to them. Bone-meal (BM), cow liver (CL), and rotten chicken viscera (CV) were used as bait to collect flies. In total, 3,387 Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, and Muscidae adult flies were collected. The most abundant species were Lucilia ochricornis (Wiedemann 1830), Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann 1819) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), Peckia (Sarcodexia) lambens (Wiedemann 1830) (Diptera: Sarcophagidae), and Ophyra capensis (Wiedemann 1818) (Diptera: Muscidae). The type of bait had significant effects on both the total richness (F2,18 = 57.08; P < 0.0001) and the effective number of species (F2,18 = 12.81; P = 0.0003) per trap. The average richness was higher in traps baited with chicken viscera, followed by cow liver and finally by bone-meal. The composition of cow liver and bone meal species constitute subsets of the species collected with chicken viscera, thus using the three baits would not increase the number of species detected. These results indicate that chicken viscera is the most efficient bait for testing or assessing necrophagous fly diversity.

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          Partitioning the turnover and nestedness components of beta diversity

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            Models and estimators linking individual-based and sample-based rarefaction, extrapolation and comparison of assemblages

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              The role of carrion in maintaining biodiversity and ecological processes in terrestrial ecosystems.

              Carrion provides a resource for a subset of animal species that deliver a critical ecosystem service by consuming dead animal matter and recycling its nutrients. A growing number of studies have also shown various effects of carrion on different plant and microbial communities. However, there has been no review of these studies to bring this information together and identify priority areas for future research. We review carrion ecology studies from the last two decades and summarise the range of spatial and temporal effects of carrion on soil nutrients, microbes, plants, arthropods, and vertebrates. We identify key knowledge gaps in carrion ecology, and discuss how closing these gaps can be achieved by focusing future research on the (1) different kinds of carrion resources, (2) interactions between different components of the carrion community, (3) the ways that ecosystem context can moderate carrion effects, and (4) considerations for carrion management. To guide this research, we outline a framework that builds on the 'ephemeral resource patch' concept, and helps to structure research questions that link localised effects of carrion with their consequences at landscape scales. This will enable improved characterisation of carrion as a unique resource pool, provide answers for land managers in a position to influence carrion availability, and establish the ways that carrion affects the dynamics of species diversity and ecological processes within landscapes.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Medical Entomology
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                0022-2585
                1938-2928
                March 2020
                February 27 2020
                November 19 2019
                March 2020
                February 27 2020
                November 19 2019
                : 57
                : 2
                : 437-442
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Físicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina
                [2 ]Facultad de Ciencias Agropecuarias, Centro de Relevamiento y Evaluación de Recursos Agrícolas y Naturales, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Vegetal (IMBIV, UNC-CONICET), Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina
                Article
                10.1093/jme/tjz192
                7e1e744a-1636-466a-9cfa-60461c5f4ce3
                © 2019

                https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model

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