5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      The perception of vowelless words in Tashlhiyt

      1 , 2 , 3
      Glossa: a journal of general linguistics
      Open Library of the Humanities

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          This study examines the perceptual mechanisms involved in the processing of words without vowels, a lexical form that is common in Tashlhiyt but highly dispreferred cross-linguistically. In Experiment 1, native Tashlhiyt and non-native (English-speaking) listeners completed a paired discrimination task where the middle segment of the different-pair was either a vowel (e.g., fan vs. fin), consonant (e.g., ʁbr vs. ʁdr), or vowelless vs. voweled contrast (e.g., tlf vs. tuf). Experiment 2 was a word-likeness ratings task of tri-segmental nonwords constructed to vary in the sonority of the middle segment. We find that vowelless words containing different types of sonority profiles were generally highly discriminable by both native and non-native listeners. This can be explained by the phonetic and acoustic properties of vowelless words: Since Tashlhiyt exhibits low consonant-to-consonant coarticulation, the presence of robust consonantal cues in the speech signal means that the internal phonological structure of vowelless words is recoverable by listeners. At the same time, word-likeness ratings of nonwords indicated that listeners relied on their native-language experience to judge the wellformedness of new words: Tashlhiyt listeners were most likely to accept obstruent-centered vowelless words; meanwhile, English listeners’ preferences increased with higher sonority values of the word center. Across both experiments, speech style variation provided further evidence as to how the phonetic implementation of vowelless words makes them perceptually stable. Thus, our findings provide an overview of the low-level acoustic-phonetic and higher-level phonological processing mechanisms involved in the perception of vowelless words. Our results can inform understandings of the relationship between language-specific phonetic variation and phonotactic patterns, as well as how auditory processing mechanisms shape phonological typology.

          Related collections

          Most cited references84

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          A new look at the statistical model identification

          IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 19(6), 716-723
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Headphone screening to facilitate web-based auditory experiments

            Psychophysical experiments conducted remotely over the internet permit data collection from large numbers of participants, but sacrifice control over sound presentation, and therefore are not widely employed in hearing research. To help standardize online sound presentation, we introduce a brief psychophysical test for determining if online experiment participants are wearing headphones. Listeners judge which of three pure tones is quietest, with one of the tones presented 180° out of phase across the stereo channels. This task is intended to be easy over headphones but difficult over loudspeakers due to phase-cancellation. We validated the test in the lab by testing listeners known to be wearing headphones or listening over loudspeakers. The screening test was effective and efficient, discriminating between the two modes of listening with a small number of trials. When run online, a bimodal distribution of scores was obtained, suggesting that some participants performed the task over loudspeakers despite instructions to use headphones. The ability to detect and screen out these participants mitigates concerns over sound quality for online experiments, a first step toward opening auditory perceptual research to the possibilities afforded by crowdsourcing.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Book Chapter: not found

              Explaining Phonetic Variation: A Sketch of the H&H Theory

              B Lindblom (1990)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Glossa: a journal of general linguistics
                Open Library of the Humanities
                2397-1835
                January 7 2024
                January 10 2024
                : 9
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ]University of California, Davis
                [2 ]CNRS & Université Paris 8
                [3 ]Mohammed V University in Rabat – FLHS
                Article
                10.16995/glossa.10438
                7e4f1ba1-ab69-4ee8-82f9-b471d34f81e3
                © 2024

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article