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      Weight status and health behaviors of adolescents and young adults with sickle cell disease: The emerging risk for obesity.

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          Abstract

          Historically, youth with sickle cell disease (SCD) were at risk for being underweight, but recent data suggests this population is replicating obesity trends of youth in the United States. The current observational study assessed the weight status and health behaviors of 44 adolescents and young adults with SCD via a self-report survey and chart review. Using height and weight data closest to survey completion date, 27% of participants were either overweight or obese. With respect to obesogenic risk behaviors, 77% ate fast food 1-3 times per week, 25% had no fruits/vegetables with any of their meals, 11% drank no water, and 57% watched 4 or more hours of television per day. Though more research is needed, this preliminary study adds to the SCD literature suggesting an emerging shift toward obesity in this population. As such, adolescents with SCD may benefit from interventions to decrease obesity risk factors as being overweight or obese has the potential to worsen SCD-related symptoms and complications.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Pediatr Hematol Oncol
          Pediatric hematology and oncology
          Informa UK Limited
          1521-0669
          0888-0018
          Apr 2021
          : 38
          : 3
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
          [2 ] Section of Pediatric Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Brenner Children's Hospital, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.
          [3 ] Clinical Nutrition Department, Dayton Children's Hospital, Dayton, Ohio, USA.
          [4 ] Department of Rehabilitation, Exercise, and Nutrition Sciences, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
          [5 ] James Anderson Center for Health Systems, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
          [6 ] Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
          Article
          10.1080/08880018.2020.1838010
          33150822
          7ea26e20-6f59-402e-81d0-05b93c239d55

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