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      Psychogeriatric Care in a Forensic Setting

      Journal of Mental Health and Addiction Nursing

      Dougmar Publishing Group, Inc.

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          Abstract

          Background and Objective: With an aging population, it has become increasingly important that nurses are equipped to provide appropriate psychogeriatric care.  Patients with dementia are more likely of committing legal violations related to their behavioural and psychosocial symptoms.  Thus, it is imperative that we explore how nursing staff can effectively manage psychogeriatric care in a forensic setting, in order to minimize stress and burnout of staff.  Material and Methods: Three populations were explored with the context of dementia and the justice system: patients with dementia who enter the forensic system, aging inmates in corrections, and criminal offenders in long-term residential care.  The literature suggests that there is a dilemma as to where this population is best managed as there are no appropriate designated psychiatric facilities for the elderly offenders.  Four options for geriatric service enhancement will be explored:  Provide Gentle Persuasive Approach (GPA) training to forensic staff; modification of existing policies and procedures to support appropriate geriatric care; implement the use of Psychiatric Care Aides in skill mix; and create a secure forensic unit for geriatric populations. Results: The recommendation for action is to implement education specific to psychogeriatric care, while also adjusting policies and procedures for a forensic centre to support therapeutic care.  Conclusions: The author argues that further research is needed that will determine the design of a new Psychogeriatric Forensic Centre.  

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          Most cited references 8

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          Empathy, experience of burnout and attitudes towards demented patients among nursing staff in geriatric care

          A non-anonymous questionnaire was distributed to all nursing staff (n = 557) including RNs, LPNs (psychiatric), LPNs (somatic) and nurses' aides, in one nursing home, one somatic long-term care clinic and one psychogeriatric clinic. Scales measuring empathy, burnout experience and attitudes towards demented patients were included in the questionnaire. The aim of the study was to compare levels of empathy, burnout experience and attitudes among different categories of nursing staff and to examine connections between empathy, burnout and attitudes. The nursing staff showed an overall figure of moderately well-developed empathy and the RNs showed the highest empathy. The RNs had a significantly lower degree of burnout compared to the nurses' aides and the LPNs. Of all respondents, 27.4% were assessed at risk from burnout. Overall, the staff showed a moderately positive attitude towards demented patients and the RNs were most positive. No linear correlation was found between empathy, burnout experience and attitudes. However, a weak negative correlation between burnout and empathy is in accordance with other authors who are suggesting that burnout experience leads to lower empathy in the nursing staff. The fact that the RNs showed the most positive attitudes towards demented patients and had the highest level of empathy compared to LPNs and nurses' aides could be related to lower degree of burnout assessed in the RNs. Qualitative and quantitative overload among the LPNs and nurses' aides connected to the growing number of demented patients in the institutions examined are discussed.
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            Lying in dementia care: An example of a culture that deceives in people's best interests

            Deceiving, bending the truth and being dishonest are all terms used for the act of lying. The use of deception in health settings has a rich cross-cultural history. In relation to dementia care, first, Deceptive practices in managing a family member with Alzheimer's disease. Symbolic Interaction, 17(1), 21-36) distinguished between four kinds of lies used by staff: 'going along with a misperception', 'with-holding the truth', 'little white lies' and 'use of tricks'. This article examined the issue of deception, developing a questionnaire to investigate attitudes towards lying to people with dementia. Secondly, information on the use of lies was presented within a workshop to determine whether it would lead to attitude change.
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              Stress and Burnout of Nursing Staff Working With Geriatric Clients in Long-Term Care

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Mental Health and Addiction Nursing
                JMHAN
                Dougmar Publishing Group, Inc.
                2561-309X
                October 18 2017
                October 18 2017
                : 1
                : 2
                : e1-e5
                Article
                10.22374/jmhan.v1i2.23
                © 2017

                Copyright of articles published in all DPG titles is retained by the author. The author grants DPG the rights to publish the article and identify itself as the original publisher. The author grants DPG exclusive commercial rights to the article. The author grants any non-commercial third party the rights to use the article freely provided original author(s) and citation details are cited. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                Nursing

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