Blog
About

43
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Symbiota – A virtual platform for creating voucher-based biodiversity information communities

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Abstract

          We review the Symbiota software platform for creating voucher-based biodiversity information portals and communities. Symbiota was originally conceived to promote small- to medium-sized, regionally and/or taxonomically themed collaborations of natural history collections. Over the past eight years the taxonomically diverse portals have grown into an important resource in North America and beyond for mobilizing, integrating, and using specimen- and observation-based occurrence records and derivative biodiversity information products. Designed to mirror the conceptual structure of traditional floras and faunas, Symbiota is exclusively web-based and employs a novel data model, information linking, and algorithms to provide highly dynamic customization. The themed portals enable meaningful access to biodiversity data for anyone from specialist to high school student. Symbiota emulates functionality of modern Content Management Systems, providing highly sophisticated yet intuitive user interfaces for data entry, batch processes, and editing. Each kind of content provision may be selectively accessed by authenticated information providers. Occupying a fairly specific niche in the biodiversity informatics arena, Symbiota provides extensive data exchange facilities and collaborates with other development projects to incorporate and not duplicate functionality as appropriate.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 69

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          New developments in museum-based informatics and applications in biodiversity analysis.

          Information from natural history collections (NHCs) about the diversity, taxonomy and historical distributions of species worldwide is becoming increasingly available over the Internet. In light of this relatively new and rapidly increasing resource, we critically review its utility and limitations for addressing a diverse array of applications. When integrated with spatial environmental data, NHC data can be used to study a broad range of topics, from aspects of ecological and evolutionary theory, to applications in conservation, agriculture and human health. There are challenges inherent to using NHC data, such as taxonomic inaccuracies and biases in the spatial coverage of data, which require consideration. Promising research frontiers include the integration of NHC data with information from comparative genomics and phylogenetics, and stronger connections between the environmental analysis of NHC data and experimental and field-based tests of hypotheses.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Darwin Core: An Evolving Community-Developed Biodiversity Data Standard

            Biodiversity data derive from myriad sources stored in various formats on many distinct hardware and software platforms. An essential step towards understanding global patterns of biodiversity is to provide a standardized view of these heterogeneous data sources to improve interoperability. Fundamental to this advance are definitions of common terms. This paper describes the evolution and development of Darwin Core, a data standard for publishing and integrating biodiversity information. We focus on the categories of terms that define the standard, differences between simple and relational Darwin Core, how the standard has been implemented, and the community processes that are essential for maintenance and growth of the standard. We present case-study extensions of the Darwin Core into new research communities, including metagenomics and genetic resources. We close by showing how Darwin Core records are integrated to create new knowledge products documenting species distributions and changes due to environmental perturbations.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Biology: The big challenges of big data.

               Vivien Marx (2013)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Biodivers Data J
                Biodivers Data J
                Biodiversity Data Journal
                Biodiversity Data Journal
                Biodiversity Data Journal
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2836
                1314-2828
                2014
                24 June 2014
                : 2
                Affiliations
                []University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, United States of America
                []Arizona State University, Tempe, United States of America
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Corinna Gries ( cgries@ 123456wisc.edu ).

                Academic editor: Lyubomir Penev.

                Article
                Biodiversity Data Journal 3437
                10.3897/BDJ.2.e1114
                4092327
                25057252
                Corinna Gries, Edward E. Gilbert, Nico M. Franz

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CC-BY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Counts
                Figures: 8, Tables: 1, References: 65
                Funding
                Funded by: The development of Symbiota and advancement of related specimen digitization activities have been supported by the National Science Foundation under awards DBI-9983132, DBI-0096982, DBI-0237418, DBI-0743827, DBI-0847966, DEB-1155984, EF-1115116, and EF-1207107. Additional contributions through regional sources have further supported the development of Symbiota components.
                Categories
                Software Description
                Plantae
                Fungi
                Animalia
                Systematics
                Data Management

                Comments

                Comment on this article