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      ESPEN practical guideline: Clinical nutrition in liver disease

      , , , , , ,

      Clinical Nutrition

      Elsevier BV

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          Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adiposity and lipids and decreases insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese humans.

          Studies in animals have documented that, compared with glucose, dietary fructose induces dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. To assess the relative effects of these dietary sugars during sustained consumption in humans, overweight and obese subjects consumed glucose- or fructose-sweetened beverages providing 25% of energy requirements for 10 weeks. Although both groups exhibited similar weight gain during the intervention, visceral adipose volume was significantly increased only in subjects consuming fructose. Fasting plasma triglyceride concentrations increased by approximately 10% during 10 weeks of glucose consumption but not after fructose consumption. In contrast, hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and the 23-hour postprandial triglyceride AUC were increased specifically during fructose consumption. Similarly, markers of altered lipid metabolism and lipoprotein remodeling, including fasting apoB, LDL, small dense LDL, oxidized LDL, and postprandial concentrations of remnant-like particle-triglyceride and -cholesterol significantly increased during fructose but not glucose consumption. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels increased and insulin sensitivity decreased in subjects consuming fructose but not in those consuming glucose. These data suggest that dietary fructose specifically increases DNL, promotes dyslipidemia, decreases insulin sensitivity, and increases visceral adiposity in overweight/obese adults.
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            EASL-EASD-EASO Clinical Practice Guidelines for the management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

            (2016)
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              Liver Fibrosis, but No Other Histologic Features, Is Associated With Long-term Outcomes of Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

              Histologic analysis of liver biopsy specimens allows for grading and staging of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We performed a longitudinal study to investigate the long-term prognostic relevance of histologic features for patients with NAFLD.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
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                Journal
                Clinical Nutrition
                Clinical Nutrition
                Elsevier BV
                02615614
                December 2020
                December 2020
                : 39
                : 12
                : 3533-3562
                Article
                10.1016/j.clnu.2020.09.001
                © 2020

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