0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      The effect of elevational gradient on alpine gingers ( Roscoea alpina and R. purpurea) in the Himalayas

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          There is currently enormous interest in how morphological and physiological responses of herbaceous plants may be affected by changing elevational gradient. Mountain regions provide an excellent opportunity to understand how closely related species may adapt to the conditions that rapidly change with elevation. We investigated the morphological and physiological responses of two Himalayan alpine gingers ( Roscoea alpina and R. purpurea) along two different vertical transects of 400 m, R. purpurea between 2,174–2,574 m a.s.l and R. alpina between 2,675–3,079 m a.s.l. We measured the variables of plant height, leaf length, leaf area, specific leaf area, and stomata density at five plots, along the vertical transect at an elevational gap of ca. 100 m. Results revealed that with increased elevation plant height, and leaf area decreased while stomata density increased, whereas changes in specific leaf area, were not correlated with the elevation. Our results reveal that these alpine gingers undergo local adaptation by modifying their plant height, leaf area and stomata density in response to the varying selection pressure associated with the elevational gradient. Thus, the findings of this research provide valuable information on how a narrow range of elevational gradient affects the herbaceous plants at the alpine habitat of the Himalayas.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 45

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          A re-assessment of high elevation treeline positions and their explanation

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            EVOLUTIONARY RESPONSES TO CHANGING CLIMATE

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Specific leaf area and leaf dry matter content as alternative predictors of plant strategies

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                PeerJ
                PeerJ
                peerj
                peerj
                PeerJ
                PeerJ Inc. (San Diego, USA )
                2167-8359
                17 September 2019
                2019
                : 7
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Yunnan Key Laboratory of Plant Reproductive Adaption and Evolutionary Ecology, Yunnan University , Kunming, Yunnan, China
                [2 ]Laboratory of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-Resources in Yunnan, Yunnan University , Kunming, Yunnan, China
                [3 ]Department of Botany, Prithvi Narayan Campus, Tribhuvan University , Pokhara, Gandaki, Nepal
                [4 ]School of Media and Communication, RMIT University , Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
                Article
                7503
                10.7717/peerj.7503
                6753920
                ©2019 Paudel et al.

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, reproduction and adaptation in any medium and for any purpose provided that it is properly attributed. For attribution, the original author(s), title, publication source (PeerJ) and either DOI or URL of the article must be cited.

                Funding
                Funded by: Australian Research Council Discovery Projects funding scheme
                Award ID: DP160100161
                This work was supported by the Australian Research Council Discovery Projects funding scheme DP160100161 to Adrian G Dyer. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
                Categories
                Biodiversity
                Biogeography
                Ecology
                Plant Science
                Climate Change Biology

                Comments

                Comment on this article