4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Developmental effects of a chimeric ultraspiracle gene derived from Drosophila and Chironomus.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The ultraspiracle (usp) gene encodes a nuclear receptor that forms a heterodimer with the ecdysone receptor (EcR) to mediate transcriptional responses to the insect steroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20HE). The responses ultimately elicit changes associated with molting and metamorphosis. Although Ultraspiracle (USP) is required at several developmental times, it is unclear whether USP plays stage-specific roles in Drosophila. A chimeric transgene (d/cusp), produced by replacing the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of Drosophila USP with the equivalent domain from another Diptera, Chironomus tentans, was tested for its ability to rescue Drosophila usp mutants from early larval lethality. A single copy of the d/cusp was sufficient to rescue transformants from several lines through larval development but they died suddenly during the late third instar. Additional doses of d/cusp were required to allow survival through the adult stage, but they did not restore a normal prepupal contraction. Thus, the arrest at the onset of metamorphosis apparently is caused by the impaired ability of the chimeric USP to mediate a stage-specific function associated with the LBD.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Genesis
          Genesis (New York, N.Y. : 2000)
          1526-954X
          1526-954X
          December 6 2000
          : 28
          : 3-4
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Biology, University of North Carolina-Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina 27402-6174, USA. vincent_henrich@uncg.edu
          Article
          10.1002/1526-968X(200011/12)28:3/4<125::AID-GENE50>3.0.CO;2-S
          11105053

          Comments

          Comment on this article