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      Ultra-Dense Networks: A Survey

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          What Will 5G Be?

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            Massive MIMO for Next Generation Wireless Systems

             ,  ,   (2014)
            Multi-user Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) offers big advantages over conventional point-to-point MIMO: it works with cheap single-antenna terminals, a rich scattering environment is not required, and resource allocation is simplified because every active terminal utilizes all of the time-frequency bins. However, multi-user MIMO, as originally envisioned with roughly equal numbers of service-antennas and terminals and frequency division duplex operation, is not a scalable technology. Massive MIMO (also known as "Large-Scale Antenna Systems", "Very Large MIMO", "Hyper MIMO", "Full-Dimension MIMO" & "ARGOS") makes a clean break with current practice through the use of a large excess of service-antennas over active terminals and time division duplex operation. Extra antennas help by focusing energy into ever-smaller regions of space to bring huge improvements in throughput and radiated energy efficiency. Other benefits of massive MIMO include the extensive use of inexpensive low-power components, reduced latency, simplification of the media access control (MAC) layer, and robustness to intentional jamming. The anticipated throughput depend on the propagation environment providing asymptotically orthogonal channels to the terminals, but so far experiments have not disclosed any limitations in this regard. While massive MIMO renders many traditional research problems irrelevant, it uncovers entirely new problems that urgently need attention: the challenge of making many low-cost low-precision components that work effectively together, acquisition and synchronization for newly-joined terminals, the exploitation of extra degrees of freedom provided by the excess of service-antennas, reducing internal power consumption to achieve total energy efficiency reductions, and finding new deployment scenarios. This paper presents an overview of the massive MIMO concept and contemporary research.
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              A Tractable Approach to Coverage and Rate in Cellular Networks

               ,  ,   (2011)
              Cellular networks are usually modeled by placing the base stations on a grid, with mobile users either randomly scattered or placed deterministically. These models have been used extensively but suffer from being both highly idealized and not very tractable, so complex system-level simulations are used to evaluate coverage/outage probability and rate. More tractable models have long been desirable. We develop new general models for the multi-cell signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) using stochastic geometry. Under very general assumptions, the resulting expressions for the downlink SINR CCDF (equivalent to the coverage probability) involve quickly computable integrals, and in some practical special cases can be simplified to common integrals (e.g., the Q-function) or even to simple closed-form expressions. We also derive the mean rate, and then the coverage gain (and mean rate loss) from static frequency reuse. We compare our coverage predictions to the grid model and an actual base station deployment, and observe that the proposed model is pessimistic (a lower bound on coverage) whereas the grid model is optimistic, and that both are about equally accurate. In addition to being more tractable, the proposed model may better capture the increasingly opportunistic and dense placement of base stations in future networks.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials
                IEEE Commun. Surv. Tutorials
                Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
                1553-877X
                24 2016
                24 2016
                : 18
                : 4
                : 2522-2545
                Article
                10.1109/COMST.2016.2571730
                © 2016
                Product

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