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      Self-Presentation 2.0: Narcissism and Self-Esteem on Facebook

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      Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking

      Mary Ann Liebert Inc

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          Abstract

          Online social networking sites have revealed an entirely new method of self-presentation. This cyber social tool provides a new site of analysis to examine personality and identity. The current study examines how narcissism and self-esteem are manifested on the social networking Web site Facebook.com . Self-esteem and narcissistic personality self-reports were collected from 100 Facebook users at York University. Participant Web pages were also coded based on self-promotional content features. Correlation analyses revealed that individuals higher in narcissism and lower in self-esteem were related to greater online activity as well as some self-promotional content. Gender differences were found to influence the type of self-promotional content presented by individual Facebook users. Implications and future research directions of narcissism and self-esteem on social networking Web sites are discussed.

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          Most cited references 12

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          Possible selves.

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            Identity construction on Facebook: Digital empowerment in anchored relationships

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              MySpace and Facebook: applying the uses and gratifications theory to exploring friend-networking sites.

              The increased use of the Internet as a new tool in communication has changed the way people interact. This fact is even more evident in the recent development and use of friend-networking sites. However, no research has evaluated these sites and their impact on college students. Therefore, the present study was conducted to evaluate: (a) why people use these friend-networking sites, (b) what the characteristics are of the typical college user, and (c) what uses and gratifications are met by using these sites. Results indicated that the vast majority of college students are using these friend-networking sites for a significant portion of their day for reasons such as making new friends and locating old friends. Additionally, both men and women of traditional college age are equally engaging in this form of online communication with this result holding true for nearly all ethnic groups. Finally, results showed that many uses and gratifications are met by users (e.g., "keeping in touch with friends"). Results are discussed in light of the impact that friend-networking sites have on communication and social needs of college students.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
                Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
                Mary Ann Liebert Inc
                2152-2715
                2152-2723
                August 2010
                August 2010
                : 13
                : 4
                : 357-364
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, Canada.
                Article
                10.1089/cyber.2009.0257
                20712493
                © 2010

                http://www.liebertpub.com/nv/resources-tools/text-and-data-mining-policy/121/

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