Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Lupus Nephritis in Children: Prognostic Significance of Clinicopathological Findings

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background: We aimed to review our experience with childhood lupus nephritis (LN) in respect to the analysis of the clinical and histopathological presentation of LN and prognostic factors affecting the kidney and patient outcomes. Method: Forty-three children (39 girls, 4 boys) with biopsy-proven LN were included in the study. The mean age of the children was 12.0 ± 2.8 years. Based on the renal histopathology and clinical presentation, patients were treated with oral prednisone, intravenous pulses of methylprednisolone or intravenous cyclophosphamide. The final clinical status was classified as follows: (1) renal and extrarenal remission; (2) clinically active renal disease, or (3) adverse outcome, i.e., end-stage renal failure (ESRF) or death. Results: The mean duration of follow-up was 7.2 ± 2.8 years (1 month to 14.2 years). All 43 children had hematuria and 53.5% had proteinuria at admission. Fourteen children were in nephrotic status at the onset of disease. Class IV (diffuse proliferative) nephritis was observed in 29 patients as the most frequent histopathology (67.4%). The patients with class IV nephritis had a tendency to develop nephrotic syndrome, heavy proteinuria, increased Cr levels and persistent hypertension at initial evaluation. Thirty-two of 43 children (74.4%) were in renal remission at the last visit. Five-year kidney and patient survival rates from the time of diagnosis to the endpoints of ESRF or death were 83.7 and 90.7% respectively in the whole group while it was 75.9 and 86.2% respectively in the class IV group. Adverse outcome was significantly associated with the persistent hypertension, anemia, high serum Cr level, heavy proteinuria, nephrotic syndrome and class IV nephritis at presentation. Conclusion: We can conclude that the prognosis of LN in children is primarily dependent on the histopathological lesions. Severity of the clinical renal disease at admission and presence of persistent hypertension are the main poor prognostic factors rather than age, gender, low C3 and C4 levels, ANA positivity and the treatment modalities in Turkish children.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 3

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Long-term follow-up of patients with lupus nephritis

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Prognostic value of renal biopsy and clinical variables in patients with lupus nephritis and normal serum creatinine

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Lupus nephritis in children

               J Gloor,  JM Gloor (1998)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                NEF
                Nephron
                10.1159/issn.1660-8151
                Nephron
                S. Karger AG
                1660-8151
                2235-3186
                2001
                2001
                16 February 2001
                : 87
                : 2
                : 118-126
                Affiliations
                Departments of aPediatric Nephrology and bPathology, University of Istanbul, Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey
                Article
                45899 Nephron 2001;87:118–126
                10.1159/000045899
                11244305
                © 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Tables: 5, References: 51, Pages: 9
                Product
                Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/45899
                Categories
                Original Paper

                Comments

                Comment on this article