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      Surgical Navigation System and Method Using Audio Feedback

      International Conference on Auditory Display '98 (AD)

      Auditory Display

      1-4 November 1998

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          Abstract

          We discuss an experimental audio feedback system and method for positional guidance in real-time surgical instrument placement tasks. This system is intended for future usability testing in order to ascertain the efficacy of the use of the aural modality for assisting surgical placement tasks in the operating room.

          The method is based on translating spatial parameters of a surgical instrument or device, such as its position or velocity with respect to some coordinate system, into a set of audio feedback parameters along the coordinates of a generalised audio space. Error signals that correspond to deviations of the actual instrument trajectory from an optimal trajectory are transformed into a set of audio signals that indicate to the user whether correction is necessary.

          An experimental hardware platform was assembled using commercially available hardware. A system for 3-D modelling, surgical procedure planning, real-time instrument tracking and audio generation was developed. Prototype software algorithms for generating audio feedback as a function of instrument navigation were designed and implemented. The system is sufficient for future usability testing.

          This technology is still in an early stage of development, with formal usability and performance testing yet to be done. However, informal usability experiments in the course of the basic engineering process indicate the use of audio is a promising alternative to, or redundancy measure in support of visual display technology for intra-operative navigation.

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          Most cited references 4

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          Improving auditory warning design: relationship between warning sound parameters and perceived urgency.

          This paper presents an experimental study of the effects of individual sound parameters on perceived (psychoacoustic) urgency. Experimental Series 1 showed that fundamental frequency, harmonic series, amplitude envelope shape, and delayed harmonics all have clear and consistent effects on perceived urgency. Experimental Series 2 showed that temporal and melodic parameters such as speed, rhythm, pitch range, and melodic structure also have clear and consistent effects on perceived urgency. The final experiment tested a set of 13 auditory warnings generated by an application of the earlier experimental findings. The urgency rank ordering of this warning set was predicted, and the correlation between the predicted and the obtained order was highly significant. The results of these experiments have a widespread application in the improvement of existing auditory warning systems and the design of new systems, where the psychoacoustic and psychological appropriateness of warnings could be enhanced.
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            Binocular vision in a virtual world: visual deficits following the wearing of a head-mounted display.

            The short-term effects on binocular stability of wearing a conventional head-mounted display (HMD) to explore a virtual reality environment were examined. Twenty adult subjects (aged 19-29 years) wore a commercially available HMD for 10 min while cycling around a computer generated 3-D world. The twin screen presentations were set to suit the average interpupillary distance of our subject population, to mimic the conditions of public access virtual reality systems. Subjects were examined before and after exposure to the HMD and there were clear signs of induced binocular stress for a number of the subjects. The implications of introducing such HMDs into the workplace and entertainment environments are discussed.
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              Virtual reality and telepresence for military medicine.

              The profound changes brought about by technology in the past few decades are leading to a total revolution in medicine. The advanced technologies of telepresence and virtual reality are but two of the manifestations emerging from our new information age; now all of medicine can be empowered because of this digital technology. The leading edge is on the digital battlefield, where an entire new concept in military medicine is evolving. Using remote sensors, intelligent systems, telepresence surgery and virtual reality surgical simulations, combat casualty care is prepared for the 21st century.
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                Author and article information

                Conference
                November 1998
                November 1998
                : 1-10
                Affiliations
                Computer Aided Surgery Incorporated

                New York, U.S.A.
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/AD1998.31
                © Kristen Wegner. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. International Conference on Auditory Display '98, University of Glasgow, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                International Conference on Auditory Display '98
                AD
                University of Glasgow, UK
                1-4 November 1998
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Auditory Display
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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