5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Non-ionic surfactant based vesicles (niosomes) in drug delivery

        ,

      International Journal of Pharmaceutics

      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 67

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Transmembrane ammonium sulfate gradients in liposomes produce efficient and stable entrapment of amphipathic weak bases.

          Gradients of ammonium sulfate in liposomes [(NH4)2SO4]lip. > [(NH4)2SO4]med. were used to obtain 'active' loading of amphipathic weak bases into the aqueous compartment of liposomes. The loading is a result of the base exchange with the ammonium ions. This approach was applied to encapsulate anthracyclines and acridine orange inside the liposomes at very high efficiency (> 90%). Doxorubicin was accumulated in the aqueous phase of the liposomes where it reached a level as high as 100-fold the doxorubicin concentration in the remote loading medium. Most of the intraliposomal doxorubicin was present in an aggregated state. The active entrapment and loading stability were dependent on liposome lipid composition, lipid quality, medium composition and temperature, as well as on the pKa and hydrophobicity of the base. The ammonium sulfate gradient approach differs from most other chemical approaches used for remote loading of liposomes, since it neither requires preparation of the liposomes in acidic pH, nor to alkalinize the extraliposomal aqueous phase. The stability of the ammonium ion gradient is related to the low permeability of its counterion, the sulfate, which also stabilizes anthracycline accumulation for prolonged storage periods (> 6 months) due to the aggregation and gelation of anthracycline sulfate salt.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Liposomes for the sustained drug release in vivo.

             G Blume,  G Cevc (1990)
            New lipidic carriers suitable for the sustained drug release in vivo are presented. They consist of middle sized, compact phospholipid vesicles with one or up to few lipid bilayers which are sterically stabilized with a small amount of large-head phospholipids. As an example, phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes casted with up to 10 mol% of phosphatidylethanolamine with a covalently attached polyethyleneglycol 5000 headgroup (PE-PEG) are discussed. Such vesicles exhibit a very long circulation time after an i.v. administration in mice; the improvement over pure phosphatidylcholine liposomes within the first 24 h exceeds 8000%, at this point nearly 25% of the applied PE-PEG liposomes being still in the circulation. This advantage is a consequence of reduced phagocytosis of the lipidic carriers, as shown by an in vitro assay with blood monocyte cells in the flow cytometric experiments. For example, after 6 h incubation with THP-1 monocyte cells in human plasma the difference between the uptake of standard distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) and novel liposomes containing 10% distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine-PEG is by 1000%. Vesicles with 2.5 mol% DSPE-PEG are also taken-up via phagocytosis relatively slowly. But the latter vesicles, moreover, retain most of the enclosed model-drug carboxyfluorescein after an incubation in plasma. The rate of permeation of the encapsulated substance from such DSPE-PEG liposomes is below 2.4% per h. This is by approximately a factor of two less than for pure DSPC liposomes; vesicles with a higher PE-PEG content are inferior in this respect. Long circulation time and high retention of the newly developed liposomes open up ways for the future systemic use as such stabilized drug carriers for the therapeutic applications in vivo.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Dehydration-Rehydration Vesicles: A Simple Method for High Yield Drug Entrapment in Liposomes

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                International Journal of Pharmaceutics
                International Journal of Pharmaceutics
                Elsevier BV
                03785173
                October 1998
                October 1998
                : 172
                : 1-2
                : 33-70
                Article
                10.1016/S0378-5173(98)00169-0
                © 1998

                Comments

                Comment on this article