0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
2 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Taxonomic revision of the genus Oodera Westwood, 1874 (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea, Pteromalidae, Cleonyminae), with description of ten new species

      ,

      Journal of Hymenoptera Research

      Pensoft Publishers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The world species of OoderaWestwood, 1874 (Chalcidoidea: Pteromalidae: Cleonyminae: Ooderini) are revised. We examined 115 specimens of this rarely collected genus and based on morphological characters assign 110 specimens to 20 recognised species, of which the following ten are described as new: Ooderacircularicollis sp. n.(Morocco), O.felix sp. n.(Central African Republic), O.fidelis sp. n.(Vietnam), O.florea sp. n.(Thailand), O.heikewernerae sp. n.(Botswana and South Africa), O.leibnizi sp. n.(Papua New Guinea, Malaysia and Phillippines), O.mkomaziensis sp. n.(Tanzania), O.namibiensis sp. n.(Namibia), O.niehuisorum sp. n.(Egypt and Israel), and O.srilankiensis sp. n.(Sri Lanka). OoderamonstrumNikol’skaya, 1952, syn. n., is synonymised under O.formosa(Giraud, 1863). Five specimens could not be assigned to species and are treated as Ooderasp. Redescriptions are provided for all previously described valid species. OoderaalbopilosaCrosby, 1909 is excluded from Ooderaand transferred to EupelmusDalman, 1820 (Eupelmidae) as E.albopilosa(Crosby, 1909) n. comb. OoderarufimanaWestwood, 1874 and O.obscuraWestwood, 1874 are treated as nomina dubiabecause we were unable to locate type specimens and the original descriptions are not sufficiently informative to clarify the taxonomic status of these names. Several specimens from North America are identified as introduced specimens of the European species O.formosa. We provide images and diagnostic characters for all 20 included species and an identification key to species.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 9

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          A phylogenetic analysis of the megadiverse Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera)

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            A Molecular Phylogeny of the Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera)

            Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera) are extremely diverse with more than 23,000 species described and over 500,000 species estimated to exist. This is the first comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the superfamily based on a molecular analysis of 18S and 28S ribosomal gene regions for 19 families, 72 subfamilies, 343 genera and 649 species. The 56 outgroups are comprised of Ceraphronoidea and most proctotrupomorph families, including Mymarommatidae. Data alignment and the impact of ambiguous regions are explored using a secondary structure analysis and automated (MAFFT) alignments of the core and pairing regions and regions of ambiguous alignment. Both likelihood and parsimony approaches are used to analyze the data. Overall there is no impact of alignment method, and few but substantial differences between likelihood and parsimony approaches. Monophyly of Chalcidoidea and a sister group relationship between Mymaridae and the remaining Chalcidoidea is strongly supported in all analyses. Either Mymarommatoidea or Diaprioidea are the sister group of Chalcidoidea depending on the analysis. Likelihood analyses place Rotoitidae as the sister group of the remaining Chalcidoidea after Mymaridae, whereas parsimony nests them within Chalcidoidea. Some traditional family groups are supported as monophyletic (Agaonidae, Eucharitidae, Encyrtidae, Eulophidae, Leucospidae, Mymaridae, Ormyridae, Signiphoridae, Tanaostigmatidae and Trichogrammatidae). Several other families are paraphyletic (Perilampidae) or polyphyletic (Aphelinidae, Chalcididae, Eupelmidae, Eurytomidae, Pteromalidae, Tetracampidae and Torymidae). Evolutionary scenarios discussed for Chalcidoidea include the evolution of phytophagy, egg parasitism, sternorrhynchan parasitism, hypermetamorphic development and heteronomy.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Transcriptome sequence-based phylogeny of chalcidoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) reveals a history of rapid radiations, convergence, and evolutionary success.

              Chalcidoidea are a megadiverse group of mostly parasitoid wasps of major ecological and economical importance that are omnipresent in almost all extant terrestrial habitats. The timing and pattern of chalcidoid diversification is so far poorly understood and has left many important questions on the evolutionary history of Chalcidoidea unanswered. In this study, we infer the early divergence events within Chalcidoidea and address the question of whether or not ancestral chalcidoids were small egg parasitoids. We also trace the evolution of some key traits: jumping ability, development of enlarged hind femora, and associations with figs. Our phylogenetic inference is based on the analysis of 3,239 single-copy genes across 48 chalcidoid wasps and outgroups representatives. We applied an innovative a posteriori evaluation approach to molecular clock-dating based on nine carefully validated fossils, resulting in the first molecular clock-based estimation of deep Chalcidoidea divergence times. Our results suggest a late Jurassic origin of Chalcidoidea, with a first divergence of morphologically and biologically distinct groups in the early to mid Cretaceous, between 129 and 81 million years ago (mya). Diversification of most extant lineages happened rapidly after the Cretaceous in the early Paleogene, between 75 and 53 mya. The inferred Chalcidoidea tree suggests a transition from ancestral minute egg parasitoids to larger-bodied parasitoids of other host stages during the early history of chalcidoid evolution. The ability to jump evolved independently at least three times, namely in Eupelmidae, Encyrtidae, and Tanaostigmatidae. Furthermore, the large-bodied strongly sclerotized species with enlarged hind femora in Chalcididae and Leucospidae are not closely related. Finally, the close association of some chalcidoid wasps with figs, either as pollinators, or as inquilines/gallers or as parasitoids, likely evolved at least twice independently: in the Eocene, giving rise to fig pollinators, and in the Oligocene or Miocene, resulting in non-pollinating fig-wasps, including gallers and parasitoids. The origins of very speciose lineages (e.g., Mymaridae, Eulophidae, Pteromalinae) are evenly spread across the period of chalcidoid evolution from early Cretaceous to the late Eocene. Several shifts in biology and morphology (e.g., in host exploitation, body shape and size, life history), each followed by rapid radiations, have likely enabled the evolutionary success of Chalcidoidea.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Hymenoptera Research
                JHR
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2607
                1070-9428
                April 30 2018
                April 30 2018
                : 63
                : 73-123
                Article
                10.3897/jhr.63.12754
                © 2018

                Comments

                Comment on this article