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      Antioxidant and other biological activities of phenols from olives and olive oil

      , ,
      Medicinal Research Reviews
      Wiley-Blackwell

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          Flavonoid intake and long-term risk of coronary heart disease and cancer in the seven countries study.

          To determine whether flavonoid intake explains differences in mortality rates from chronic diseases between populations. Cross-cultural correlation study. Sixteen cohorts of the Seven Countries Study in whom flavonoid intake at baseline around 1960 was estimated by flavonoid analysis of equivalent food composites that represented the average diet in the cohorts. Mortality from coronary heart disease, cancer (various sites), and all causes in the 16 cohorts after 25 years of follow-up. Average intake of antioxidant flavonoids was inversely associated with mortality from coronary heart disease and explained about 25% of the variance in coronary heart disease rates in the 16 cohorts. In multivariate analysis, intake of saturated fat (73%; P = 0.0001), flavonoid intake (8%, P = .01), and percentage of smokers per cohort (9%; P = .03) explained together, independent of intake of alcohol and antioxidant vitamins, 90% of the variance in coronary heart disease rates. Flavonoid intake was not independently associated with mortality from other causes. Average flavonoid intake may partly contribute to differences in coronary heart disease mortality across populations, but it does not seem to be an important determinant of cancer mortality.
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            Free radical-scavenging properties of olive oil polyphenols.

            Plants in the Mediterranean basin, such as vine and olive trees, have developed an array of antioxidant defences to protect themselves from environmental stress. Accordingly, the incidence of coronary heart disease and certain cancers is lower in the Mediterranean area, where olive oil is the dietary fat of choice. As opposed to other vegetable oils, extra virgin olive oil, which is obtained by physical pressure from a whole fruit, is rich in phenolic components that are responsible for the particular stability of the oil. We have investigated the scavenging actions of some olive oil phenolics, namely hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein, with respect to superoxide anion generation, neutrophils respiratory burst, and hypochlorous acid. The low EC50S indicate that both compounds are potent scavengers of superoxide radicals and inhibitors of neutrophils respiratory burst: whenever demonstrated in vivo, these properties may partially explain the observed lower incidence of CHD and cancer associated with the Mediterranean diet.
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              Simple and hydrolyzable phenolic compounds in virgin olive oil. 1. Their extraction, separation, and quantitative and semiquantitative evaluation by HPLC

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Medicinal Research Reviews
                Med. Res. Rev.
                Wiley-Blackwell
                0198-6325
                1098-1128
                January 2002
                January 2002
                : 22
                : 1
                : 65-75
                Article
                10.1002/med.1028
                11746176
                81220d9f-ed47-4ea0-8bdb-cd7149c59f9c
                © 2002

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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