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Use of biologically synthesized antimicrobial nanoparticles for improving peritoneal dialysis technique: a translational research perspective

Journal of Biomedical Research

Editorial Department of Journal of Biomedical Research

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      Most cited references 6

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      "Nanoantibiotics": a new paradigm for treating infectious diseases using nanomaterials in the antibiotics resistant era.

       Ae Jung Huh,  Y Kwon (2011)
      Despite the fact that we live in an era of advanced and innovative technologies for elucidating underlying mechanisms of diseases and molecularly designing new drugs, infectious diseases continue to be one of the greatest health challenges worldwide. The main drawbacks for conventional antimicrobial agents are the development of multiple drug resistance and adverse side effects. Drug resistance enforces high dose administration of antibiotics, often generating intolerable toxicity, development of new antibiotics, and requests for significant economic, labor, and time investments. Recently, nontraditional antibiotic agents have been of tremendous interest in overcoming resistance that is developed by several pathogenic microorganisms against most of the commonly used antibiotics. Especially, several classes of antimicrobial nanoparticles (NPs) and nanosized carriers for antibiotics delivery have proven their effectiveness for treating infectious diseases, including antibiotics resistant ones, in vitro as well as in animal models. This review summarizes emerging efforts in combating against infectious diseases, particularly using antimicrobial NPs and antibiotics delivery systems as new tools to tackle the current challenges in treating infectious diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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        Biological synthesis of metallic nanoparticles.

        The synthesis of metallic nanoparticles is an active area of academic and, more importantly, "application research" in nanotechnology. A variety of chemical and physical procedures could be used for synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. However, these methods are fraught with many problems including use of toxic solvents, generation of hazardous by-products, and high energy consumption. Accordingly, there is an essential need to develop environmentally benign procedures for synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. A promising approach to achieve this objective is to exploit the array of biological resources in nature. Indeed, over the past several years, plants, algae, fungi, bacteria, and viruses have been used for production of low-cost, energy-efficient, and nontoxic metallic nanoparticles. In this review, we provide an overview of various reports of synthesis of metallic nanoparticles by biological means. This review provides an overview of various methods of synthesis of metallic nanoparticles by biological means. Many chemical and physical procedures used for synthesis of metallic nanoparticles are fraught with major problems: toxic solvents, hazardous by-products, high energy consumption. Over the past several years, plants, algae, fungi, bacteria, and viruses have been used for production of low-cost, energy-efficient, and nontoxic metallic nanoparticles. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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          Peritoneal dialysis-related infections recommendations: 2010 update.

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), SGPGIMS Campus , Lucknow-226014, Uttar Pradesh, India.
            Author notes
            [ ]Corresponding author: Dr. Dinesh Kumar (Assistant Professor), Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), Lucknow-226014, Uttar Pradesh, India, Tel:+ 91-8953261506/+ 91-9044951791; Email: dineshcbmr@ 123456gmail.com .

            CLC number: R459.5, Document code: B

            The author reported no conflict of interests.

            Journal
            J Biomed Res
            J Biomed Res
            JBR
            Journal of Biomedical Research
            Editorial Department of Journal of Biomedical Research
            1674-8301
            2352-4685
            September 2016
            10 May 2016
            : 30
            : 5
            : 349-352
            5044706
            jbr-30-05-349
            10.7555/JBR.30.20150120
            © 2016 by the Journal of Biomedical Research. All rights reserved.
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            Figures: 1, Tables: 0, References: 8, Pages: 4
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