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      Indonaia rectangularis (Tapparone-Canefri, 1889), comb. nov., a forgotten freshwater mussel species from Myanmar (Bivalvia, Unionidae)

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      ZooKeys

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          Uniorectangularis Tapparone-Canefri, 1889 is a little-known nominal species of freshwater mussels described from a tributary of the Ayeyarwady River in Myanmar. This taxon was considered a synonym of Gibbosulalaosensis (Lea, 1863), a margaritiferid species. However, the range of Gibbosulalaosensis does not encompass the Ayeyarwady River watershed. Here we re-examine the holotype of Uniorectangularis and provide a conchological re-description of this species. Based on conchological features such as the shell shape, elevated umbo, and the structure of lateral and pseudocardinal teeth, we transfer this taxon to the genus Indonaia Prashad, 1918 and propose I.rectangularis (Tapparone-Canefri, 1889), comb. nov. It appears to be a rare freshwater mussel species with a restricted range, because it has not been found since the original description. Two additional species in this genus are known from Myanmar, i.e. Indonaiaandersoniana (Nevill, 1877) and I.subclathrata (Martens, 1899).

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          Most cited references 9

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          Diversity, biogeography and conservation of freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionida) in East and Southeast Asia

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            Ancient River Inference Explains Exceptional Oriental Freshwater Mussel Radiations

            The concept of long-lived (ancient) lakes has had a great influence on the development of evolutionary biogeography. According to this insight, a number of lakes on Earth have existed for several million years (e.g., Baikal and Tanganyika) and represent unique evolutionary hotspots with multiple intra-basin radiations. In contrast, rivers are usually considered to be variable systems, and the possibility of their long-term existence during geological epochs has never been tested. In this study, we reconstruct the history of freshwater basin interactions across continents based on the multi-locus fossil-calibrated phylogeny of freshwater mussels (Unionidae). These mussels most likely originated in Southeast and East Asia in the Jurassic, with the earliest expansions into North America and Africa (since the mid-Cretaceous) following the colonization of Europe and India (since the Paleocene). We discovered two ancient monophyletic mussel radiations (mean age ~51–55 Ma) within the paleo-Mekong catchment (i.e., the Mekong, Siam, and Malacca Straits paleo-river drainage basins). Our findings reveal that the Mekong may be considered a long-lived river that has existed throughout the entire Cenozoic epoch.
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              New taxa of freshwater mussels (Unionidae) from a species-rich but overlooked evolutionary hotspot in Southeast Asia

              Southeast Asia harbors a unique and diverse freshwater fauna of Mesozoic origin, which is under severe threat of extinction because of rapid economic development and urbanization. The largest freshwater basins of the region are certainly the primary evolutionary hotspots and they attract the most attention as key biodiversity areas for conservation. In contrast, medium-sized rivers are considered low-importance areas with secondary biodiversity, whose faunas originated via founder events from larger basins during the Pleistocene, although such a scenario has never been tested by using a phylogenetic approach. In this investigation, we used freshwater mussels (Unionidae) as a model to estimate the levels of endemism within the Sittaung, a little-known remote basin in Myanmar, compared with the surrounding larger rivers (Irrawaddy, Salween and Mekong). We discovered that the Sittaung represents an exceptional evolutionary hotspot with numerous endemic taxa of freshwater mussels. On the basis of our extensive dataset, we describe two new tribes, two genera, seven species and a subspecies of Unionidae. Our results highlight that medium-sized basins may represent separate evolutionary hotspots that harbor a number of endemic lineages. These basins should therefore be a focus of special conservation efforts alongside the largest Southeast Asian rivers.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                ZooKeys
                ZK
                Pensoft Publishers
                1313-2970
                1313-2989
                June 05 2019
                June 05 2019
                : 852
                : 23-30
                Article
                10.3897/zookeys.852.33898
                © 2019

                https://creativecommons.org/share-your-work/public-domain/cc0/

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