12
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Does perceived organisational support influence career intentions? The qualitative stories shared by UK early career doctors

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Introduction

          The wish to quit or take time out of medical training appears to be related, at least in part, to a strong desire for supportive working and learning environments. However, we do not have a good understanding of what a supportive culture means to early career doctors, and how perceptions of support may influence career decision making. Our aim was to explore this in UK Foundation doctors.

          Methods

          This was a qualitative study using semistructured interviews incorporating a narrative inquiry approach for data collection. Interview questions were informed by the literature as well as data from two focus groups. Interviews were carried out in two UK locations. Initial data coding and analysis were inductive, using thematic analysis. We then used the lens of Perceived Organizational Support (POS) to group themes and aid conceptual generalisability.

          Results

          Twenty-one interviews were carried out. Eleven interviewees had applied for specialty training, while ten had not. Support from senior staff and colleagues influenced participants’ job satisfaction and engagement. Positive relationships with senior staff and colleagues seemed to act as a buffer, helping participants cope with challenging situations. Feeling valued (acknowledgement of efforts, and respect) was important. Conversely, perceiving a poor level of support from the organisation and its representatives (supervisors and colleagues) had a detrimental impact on participants’ intentions to stay working within the National Health Service (NHS).

          Conclusion

          Overall, this is the first study to explore directly how experiences in early postgraduate training have a critical impact on the career intentions of trainee/resident doctors. We found perceived support in the early stages of postgraduate training was critical to whether doctors applied for higher training and/or intended to stay working in the NHS. These findings have transferable messages to other contexts struggling to recruit and retain junior doctors.

          Related collections

          Most cited references62

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          The Norm of Reciprocity: A Preliminary Statement

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The measurement and antecedents of affective, continuance and normative commitment to the organization

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Perceived organizational support: a review of the literature.

              The authors reviewed more than 70 studies concerning employees' general belief that their work organization values their contribution and cares about their well-being (perceived organizational support; POS). A meta-analysis indicated that 3 major categories of beneficial treatment received by employees (i.e., fairness, supervisor support, and organizational rewards and favorable job conditions) were associated with POS. POS, in turn, was related to outcomes favorable to employees (e.g., job satisfaction, positive mood) and the organization (e.g., affective commitment, performance, and lessened withdrawal behavior). These relationships depended on processes assumed by organizational support theory: employees' belief that the organization's actions were discretionary, feeling of obligation to aid the organization, fulfillment of socioemotional needs, and performance-reward expectancies.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                BMJ Open
                BMJ Open
                bmjopen
                bmjopen
                BMJ Open
                BMJ Publishing Group (BMA House, Tavistock Square, London, WC1H 9JR )
                2044-6055
                2018
                19 June 2018
                : 8
                : 6
                : e022833
                Affiliations
                [1 ] departmentCentre for Healthcare Education Research and Innovation (CHERI), Institute of Education for Medical and Dental Sciences , School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nutrition, University of Aberdeen , Aberdeen, UK
                [2 ] NHS Education for Scotland, Scotland Deanery , Aberdeen, UK
                Author notes
                [Correspondence to ] Ms Gillian Marion Scanlan; r01gms15@ 123456abdn.ac.uk
                Author information
                http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3510-7938
                Article
                bmjopen-2018-022833
                10.1136/bmjopen-2018-022833
                6009547
                29921689
                81b0b69f-384d-4ae1-a5f7-936d7a8cdf13
                © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

                This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                History
                : 08 March 2018
                : 15 May 2018
                : 18 May 2018
                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100010525, NHS Education for Scotland;
                Categories
                Medical Education and Training
                Research
                1506
                1709
                Custom metadata
                unlocked

                Medicine
                qualitative research
                Medicine
                qualitative research

                Comments

                Comment on this article