0
views
0
comments
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      beta-endorphin suppresses adrenocorticotropin and cortisol levels in normal human subjects.

      The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

      Adrenocorticotropic Hormone, blood, Adult, Blood Glucose, metabolism, Endorphins, diagnostic use, pharmacology, Female, Growth Hormone, Humans, Hydrocortisone, Insulin, Kinetics, Male, Middle Aged, Prolactin, beta-Endorphin

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          To determine the effect of beta-endorphin on the pituitary-adrenal axis, human synthetic beta-endorphin was infused iv in 10 normal human subjects. Either beta-endorphin (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 micrograms/kg . min, each dose for 30 min) or a control (sham) infusion of 5% dextrose water was administered in a blind fashion in the same subjects on 2 successive days. Plasma ACTH and cortisol and serum human GH and PRL levels were measured 30 min before and then every 30 min for 210 min during and after both the beta-endorphin and control infusions. In all subjects, cortisol levels decreased below the basal level in response to the infusion of beta-endorphin. The threshold dose was 1.0 micrograms/kg . min, with the mean control cortisol level (12 +/- 2 micrograms/dl) declining significantly to 7 +/- 1 micrograms/dl (1.0 micrograms/kg . min) and 6 +/- 1 micrograms/dl (3.0 micrograms/kg . min; P less than 0.01). ACTH levels also were significantly lower than the control value (48 +/- 6 pg/ml) at the 1.0 microgram/kg . min dose (32 +/- 4 pg/ml; P less than 0.05). The decline in ACTH and cortisol levels was also significantly different from levels obtained during the control infusions (P = 0.001 and P = 0.01, respectively). The results are consistent with short feedback loop inhibition of pituitary ACTH release or suppression of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor release by beta-endorphin.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          6308033
          10.1210/jcem-57-3-592

          Comments

          Comment on this article