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      Can CRISPR help in the fight against parasitic worms?

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The first reports of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in flatworms could usher in a new era of research on these dangerous human parasites.

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          Most cited references 10

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          Helminth infections: the great neglected tropical diseases.

          Helminths are parasitic worms. They are the most common infectious agents of humans in developing countries and produce a global burden of disease that exceeds better-known conditions, including malaria and tuberculosis. As we discuss here, new insights into fundamental helminth biology are accumulating through newly completed genome projects and the nascent application of transgenesis and RNA interference technologies. At the same time, our understanding of the dynamics of the transmission of helminths and the mechanisms of the Th2-type immune responses that are induced by infection with these parasitic worms has increased markedly. Ultimately, these advances in molecular and medical helminth biology should one day translate into a new and robust pipeline of drugs, diagnostics, and vaccines for targeting parasitic worms that infect humans.
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            WormBase ParaSite − a comprehensive resource for helminth genomics

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              The tumorigenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini--multiple pathways to cancer.

              Liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini is a major public health problem in Thailand and adjacent countries. In addition to infection-associated morbidity, infection with O. viverrini and the related Clonorchis sinensis are unarguable risk factors for cholangiocarcinoma (CAA, bile-duct cancer). Here we review the pathogenesis of opisthorchiasis and the association between O. viverrini infection and bile-duct cancer, focusing on the molecular parallels between wound healing, chronic inflammation, and cancer development. We review a schema for human disease progression from fluke infection, chronic opisthorchiasis, advanced periductal fibrosis, and cholangiocarcinogenesis, and present a rationale for biomarker discovery to facilitate early intervention. We conclude by addressing post-genomic advances with a view to developing new control strategies to combat this infectious cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                eLife
                Elife
                eLife
                eLife
                eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd
                2050-084X
                31 January 2019
                2019
                : 8
                Affiliations
                deptSchool of Biological Sciences Queen's University of Belfast BelfastUnited Kingdom
                Article
                44382
                10.7554/eLife.44382
                6355191
                30702425
                © 2019, McVeigh and Maule

                This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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                Microbiology and Infectious Disease
                Tropical Diseases
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                The first reports of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in flatworms could usher in a new era of research on these dangerous human parasites.

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