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      Prucalopride in Gastroparesis : A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Crossover Study

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          Abstract

          Prokinetics are considered the preferred treatment option for gastroparesis, but evidence of their efficacy is scarce. Prucalopride, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor agonist used in the treatment of constipation, is able to enhance the gastric emptying rate. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study, we evaluated the efficacy of prucalopride to improve the gastric emptying rate and symptoms in patients with gastroparesis.

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          Most cited references26

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          Development and psychometric evaluation of the patient assessment of upper gastrointestinal symptom severity index (PAGI-SYM) in patients with upper gastrointestinal disorders.

          Describe the development and evaluation of a new self-report instrument, the patient assessment of upper gastrointestinal disorders-symptom severity index (PAGI-SYM) in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), dyspepsia, or gastroparesis.
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            Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI): development and validation of a patient reported assessment of severity of gastroparesis symptoms.

            Patient-rated symptom assessments are needed for evaluating the effectiveness of medical treatments and for monitoring outcomes in gastroparesis. This paper summarizes the development and psychometric evaluation of a new instrument, the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI), for assessing severity of symptoms associated with gastroparesis. The GCSI was based on reviews of the medical literature, patient focus groups, and interviews with clinicians. A sample of 169 patients with a documented diagnosis of gastroparesis participated in the psychometric evaluation study. Patients completed the GCSI, the SF-36 Health Survey, and disability days questions at baseline and after 8 weeks. A randomly selected sub-sample of 30 subjects returned at 2 weeks to assess test retest reliability. Clinicians rated severity of symptoms, and both clinicians and patients rated change in gastroparesis-related symptoms over the 8 week study. The GCSI is based on three subscales: post-prandial fullness/early satiety (4 items); nausea/vomiting (3 items), and bloating (2 items). Internal consistency reliability was 0.84 for the GCSI total score and ranged from 0.83 to 0.85 for the subscale scores. Two week test retest reliability was 0.76 for the total score and ranged from 0.68 to 0.81 for subscale scores. Construct validity was supported, given that we observed significant relationships between clinician assessed symptom severity and GCSI total score, significant differences between gastroparesis and dyspepsia patients (n = 760) on GCSI total (p < 0.0001) and subscale scores (p < 0.03 to p < 0.0001), moderate and significant relationships between GCSI total and SF-36 scores, and significant associations between GCSI total score and reports of restricted activity and bed disability days. Patients with greater symptom severity, as rated by clinicians, reported more symptom severity on GCSI total score. GSCI total scores were responsive to changes in overall gastroparesis symptoms as assessed by clinicians (p < 0.0001) and patients (p = 0.0004). The findings of this study indicate that the GCSI is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring symptom severity in patients with gastroparesis.
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              Prucalopride (Resolor) in the treatment of severe chronic constipation in patients dissatisfied with laxatives.

              To determine the efficacy, impact on quality of life (QOL) and safety of prucalopride, a selective, high-affinity 5-HT(4) receptor agonist, in patients with chronic constipation. In this multicentre, randomised, placebo controlled, parallel-group, phase III study, patients with chronic constipation (two or fewer spontaneous complete bowel movements (SCBM)/week) received 2 mg or 4 mg prucalopride or placebo, once daily, for 12 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of patients reaching three or more SCBM/week. The key secondary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of patients having an increase of one or more SCBM/week. The primary QOL endpoint was the patient assessment of constipation QOL satisfaction subscale score. Safety parameters included adverse events, laboratory values and cardiovascular events. Efficacy was evaluated over 713 patients. Averaged over 12 weeks, higher proportions of patients on prucalopride 2 mg (19.5%; p<0.01), 4 mg (23.6%; p<0.001) had three or more SCBM/week (or normalisation of bowel function) compared with placebo (9.6%). Similar results were seen in the subgroup (83%) of patients dissatisfied with previous laxative treatment. Both doses of prucalopride also significantly improved secondary efficacy and QOL endpoints, including the proportion of patients with an increase of one or more SCBM/week, evacuation completeness, perceived disease severity and treatment effectiveness and QOL. Prucalopride 4 mg significantly reduced the need for straining versus placebo (p<0.05). The most frequent treatment-related adverse events were headache and diarrhoea. Both doses of prucalopride were safe and well tolerated. Prucalopride significantly and consistently improved bowel function, associated symptoms and satisfaction in chronically constipated patients.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The American Journal of Gastroenterology
                The American Journal of Gastroenterology
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                0002-9270
                2019
                August 2019
                : 114
                : 8
                : 1265-1274
                Article
                10.14309/ajg.0000000000000304
                31295161
                82434d71-5718-4b29-9f06-1cf7890365b3
                © 2019
                History

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