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      The risk reduction of recurrent periodontal pathogens of local application minocycline HCl 2% gel, used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing for chronic periodontitis treatment

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          Abstract

          Background

          The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological effects of local application minocycline HCl 2% gel, used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) for treatment of chronic periodontitis (CP). CP is an inflammation of periodontal tissue that is caused mainly by bacterial infection, where periodontal destruction such as loss of attachment and bone destruction occurred.

          Methods

          A total of 81 subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis whose baseline clinical attachment loss (CAL) was ≥4 mm were randomly assigned to receive SRP alone (control group, N=39) or SRP followed by four times of local application of minocycline HCl gel (Periocline) once a week (test group, N=42). Pocket depth, CAL, and papilla bleeding index were examined at baseline, 21 days, 2, 3, and 6 months. Subgingival plaque samples were collected with sterile curettes and were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction for the presence of three periodontal pathogens ( Porphyromonas gingivalis [P.g.], Tannerella forsythia [T.f.], and Treponema denticola [T.d.]) at baseline, 2, 3, and 6 months.

          Results

          The number of bacteria was reduced in both groups at 2 months after baseline (SRP treatment). The changes (2–6 months) in T.d. and T.f. counts in the test group were significantly lower than those in the control group. In the control group, a significant regrowth of P.g., T.f., and T.d. was observed from 2 to 6 months and of P.g. and T.f. from 3 to 6 months. On the other hand, in the test group, the number of the three bacteria did not significantly increase during the 6-month period.

          Conclusion

          The results showed that local application of minocycline, used as an adjunct to SRP, was effective for suppressing regrowth of periodontal pathogens, suggesting its risk reduction of recurrent periodontal pathogens in CP.

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          Most cited references 26

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          Gingival sulcus bleeding--a leading symptom in initial gingivitis.

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            Subgingival microflora and periodontal disease.

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              Progression of chronic periodontitis can be predicted by the levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola in subgingival plaque.

              Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of the teeth associated with bacteria. Diagnosis is achieved retrospectively by clinical observation of attachment loss. Predicting disease progression would allow for targeted preventive therapy. The aim of this study was to monitor disease progression in patients on a maintenance program and determine the levels of specific bacteria in subgingival plaque samples and then examine the ability of the clinical parameters of disease and levels of specific bacteria in the plaque samples to predict disease progression. During a 12-month longitudinal study of 41 subjects, 25 sites in 21 subjects experienced disease progression indicated by at least 2 mm of clinical attachment loss. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Prevotella intermedia in subgingival plaque samples. No clinical parameters were able to predict periodontal disease progression. In sites undergoing imminent periodontal disease progression within the next 3 months, significant partial correlations were found between P. gingivalis and T. forsythia (r = 0.55, P < 0.001) and T. denticola and T. forsythia (r = 0.43, P = 0.04). The odds of a site undergoing imminent periodontal disease progression increased with increasing levels of P. gingivalis and T. denticola. Monitoring the proportions of P. gingivalis and T. denticola in subgingival plaque has the potential to help identify sites at significant risk for progression of periodontitis, which would assist in the targeted treatment of disease.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-6336
                1178-203X
                2017
                10 March 2017
                : 13
                : 307-314
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia
                [2 ]Oral Sciences Research Center, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia
                [3 ]R&D, Oral Care Company, Sunstar Group, Takatsuki City, Japan
                [4 ]Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Y Soeroso, Department of Periodontology, Building B, 2nd Floor, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia, Jln Salemba Raya No 4, Jakarta Pusat, DKI Jakarta 10430, Indonesia, Tel +62 21 391 1502, Fax +62 21 391 1502, Email yuniarti_22@ 123456yahoo.co.id
                Article
                tcrm-13-307
                10.2147/TCRM.S130257
                5354525
                © 2017 Soeroso et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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                Original Research

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